1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Hawaiian
  4. >
  5. "Kimo's lazy sister is in the…

"Kimo's lazy sister is in the kitchen."

Translation:Aia ko Kimo kaikuahine moloā ma ka lumi kuke.

November 15, 2019

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HklaniClee

"Aia ke kaikuahine moloā o Kimo ma ka lumi kuke" should be accepted. That's the more common word order in general conversation for this kind of sentence. Would also like to see more use of the locatives: "ma loko o ka lumi kuke." At least for practice!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonRGB

...(kaikunāne) means brother, and (kaikuahine) means sister. However, ... these terms apply specifically to the brother of a girl, or the sister of a boy.

This means that if you are a boy and want to refer to your brother , you need to identify whether he is your older brother (kaikuaʻana) or younger brother (kaikaina). ...the same terms are used to identify the older and younger sister of a girl. (Page 179, Hawaiian Language Fundamentals ʻŌLELO ʻŌIWI, Hōkūlani Cleeland)


Kaikuahine = The sister of a brother.

Link: http://wehewehe.org/gsdl2.85/cgi-bin/hdict?e=q-11000-00---off-0hdict--00-1----0-10-0---0---0direct-10-ED--4--textpukuielbert%2ctextmamaka%2ctextandrew%2ctextparker%2ctextpeplace%2ctextclark%2ctextchd-----0-1l--11-en-Zz-1---Zz-1-home-kaikuahine--00-4-1-00-0--4----0-0-11-00-0utfZz-8-00&a=d&d=D72025

kaikuahine = Sister or female cousin of a male.

Link: http://wehewehe.org/gsdl2.85/cgi-bin/hdict?e=q-11000-00---off-0hdict--00-1----0-10-0---0---0direct-10-ED--4--textpukuielbert%2ctextmamaka%2ctextandrew%2ctextparker%2ctextchd-----0-1l--11-en-Zz-1---Zz-1-home-kaikuahine--00-4-1-00-0--4----0-0-11-00-0utfZz-8-00&a=d&d=D107561


Kino ʻŌ vs Kino ʻĀ ,

KO vs KĀ

(Grammar Link): https://www.slideshare.net/malama777/o-vs-a?next_slideshow=9

PEPEKE HENUA, HAW 101

AIA = (Slide 1 to 12)

ʻAMI PIKO ʻO is used with iʻoa or proper nouns (names of people or places). (Slide 6 to 8)

(Grammar Link): https://www.slideshare.net/malama777/pepeke-henua


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Graeme721848

Thank you for this and the slides. I used ‘O Kimo.... because I thought aia was locational and the piko was a person. It seems you have taught me that the ‘awe is the important thing to look at as it makes this a locational sentence (pekeke). I found searching this helpful too — https://hawaiian-grammar.org/current/#h.t49p98xaj29x. Mahalo nui.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacKinzieRob

Another one :-( . Since I can guess that 'Drago' doesn't mean 'Kimo' and that 'Puka' doesn't mean 'It is' the right one of the three is too obvious.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lisa610858

Why is 'tita' instead of 'kaikuahine' in this sentence wrong? Doesn't it both mean sister?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eliza727459

Maybe the focus is learning "sister of a brother."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kamakea1

Click the flag icon that says "report" and then "My answer should be accepted".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BethKing-M

They seem to use "tita" and "palala" when birth order is not the point of learning the sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BethKing-M

Has anyone else noticed that, at least for DuoLingo writers, all the negative adjectives are used primarily for females, and all the all the positive ones for males?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eliza727459

Yeah. Take heart. By the time you learn the words stupid, fat, and mean, they are more used towards males (heavy sarcasm on "take heart"). Not sure how to learn these words with indicting a class of humans....or animals.....

Learn Hawaiian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.