1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Latin
  4. >
  5. "Neptunus sees Bacchus."

"Neptunus sees Bacchus."

Translation:Neptunus Bacchum videt.

November 17, 2019

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisB-UK

Why doesn't it accept Neptune? We don't say Neptunus in UK!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NattKullav1

We also don't say Marcus or Stephanus too. Of course Duo also does not accept Mark or Stefen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

(But Duo does accept Neptune and Jupiter, no?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MathWizard7

We have to translate Neptune from English to Latin and not from Latin to English here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/psittacus_ebrius

Name translations are not being accepted in this course.

https://www.duolingo.com/skill/la/Introduction/tips-and-notes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smartbeauty86

Bacchum vs. Bacchus?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

If you understand why we say, "HE sees HIM," when talking about two different people, you'll understand that, in this Latin sentence, "HE" = Neptūnus , the one doing the seeing ( = subject of the verb, therefore nominative case), and "HIM" = Bacchum , the one seen by the other ( = direct object of the verb, therefore accusative case).

If we wanted "Bacchus sees Neptune," on the other hand, Baccus would be nominative, and Neptune would be accusative:

Bacchus Neptūnum videt , in any word order: so, also Neptūnum Bacchus videt and Videt Neptūnum Bacchus .

The one with a nominative ending (for these 2 nouns = -us) will be the subject, and the one with an accusative ending (for these 2 nouns, which are both of the "second declension," = -um) will be the direct object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smartbeauty86

Well given that I didn't understand...is the reason I asked. Thanks for the response.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

You're welcome; I'm glad if I helped make it clear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnemarieC8

In my experience it does


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zU60uNOa

Neptunus in aqua, vinum in Bacche aren’t they friends


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Bacche = "Hey, Bacchus!" or "O Bacchus, ..." (if you're praying to him, or maybe toasting him!).

If you want "in Bacchus," you'll need the ablative: in Bacchō . (He's a 2nd declension noun: Bacchus, Bacchī , m. )

Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.