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  5. "She likes the teacher."

"She likes the teacher."

Translation:Magister ei placet.

November 23, 2019

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris_P_Marsh

While the sentiments ARE similar, the translation "magistrum amat" more precisely does the job.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adriano_Araujo89

The correct would not be : "Magistram/Magistrum* ei placet"? Because "teacher " is in the accusative mode, or not?

(* the first option being in the female and the second in the male)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

magister (or magistra) ei placet is quite literally 'the teacher is pleasing to him/her/it'. The teacher is the one doing the 'pleasing' so it has to be in the nominative.

The given translation by Duo is just a more natural way to say it in English.

See DavidPNash's comment to EthanCordr (below at the time of writing) for another explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itsC14

Why is "magister ei placet", but not "illa magistrum placet" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

magister ei placet is more literally 'The teacher is pleasing to him/her/it'.

illa placet by itself would be more 'she is pleasing' which is not the idea you want to get across. Magister illi placet should work using a form of ille, illa, illud instead.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.Valerius

Why would the word order matter


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mona208606

Not i before e... not i before e...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/STRADS1551

To indicate "she", why can't I use "Illa magistra/ magister ei placet"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

'She' is represented in the sentence by ei (which could also mean he or it).

The sentence Magister (or magistra) ei placet is more literally 'The teacher is pleasing to her (or him or it)'. They probably just use the sentence 'She likes the teacher' so the English is a little more idiomatic.

The teacher is the subject (nominative) and is doing the action of pleasing. Adding illa with magistra would make the sentence more like 'She likes that teacher' or 'That teacher is pleasing to her'. It wouldn't work with magister.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wiltrud607387

Why not " ea placet"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

The sentence magister ei placet is more literally "The teacher is pleasing to him/her/it". We cannot use ea (nominative) since 'she' is not doing the pleasing. Ea placet on its own would mean something like "She is pleasing".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CAT268681

Why is it "ei" and not "ea"? This one always gets me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

The sentence magister ei placet is more literally "The teacher is pleasing to him/her/it". We cannot use ea (nominative) since 'she' is not doing the pleasing, the teacher is. We use the dative ei since that is what the verb placet takes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LufEkc

"Magistra sibi placet" is also correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

I suspect that would mean "The teacher likes themself", sibi being a reflexive pronoun.

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