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  5. "Fàilte agus tapadh leat a bh…

"Fàilte agus tapadh leat a bhalaich."

Translation:Welcome and thank you, boy.

November 27, 2019

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaet

One of those cases where the English comes out awkward. "Lad" can be vocative and polite in English, "boy" not so much.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

'Lad' will be accepted too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/04Amanita

Coming to these comments late, but thank you both kaet and Joannejoanne12 - that was driving me crazy! I'm going to use Lad from now on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MathewMervue

I understand why baloch would lenite here, but where does the additional i come from?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

It's called 'slenderisation' and happens in the vocative case (when talking to someone) as caran-neonach has specified. It does come up later in I think some words in the genetive and dative cases, but that's a fair way down the road. Basically, male name, that doesn't already have an i as the last vowel gets slenderised. If it doesn't begin with a vowel, l, n or r it gets lenited and if the final result doesn't have a vowel sound to start with there's an 'a' preceding the name. Female names the same but don't get slenderised at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

I believe this does not apply to names that end in a vowel

Anndra → Anndra

I have never seen the rule so I do not know it exactly, but I have never seen Anndra change. Can anyone state the rule? Is this phenomenon actually mentioned in any grammar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tha-seo-taghta

The same reason it's leniting; the vocative case, used when addressing someone/thing.

balach -> a bhalaich

Dòmhnall -> a Dhòmhaill

Mairead -> a Mhairead (female names don't get the "i")

Eilidh -> Eilidh (names beginning with vowels don't get the "a")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

I assume it was one of the tiles that you didn't use? IRN-BRU is a soft drink popular in Scotland and very popular in the Duolingo sentences. However, for reasons that are discussed here, it is easy to misread it as *IRN BRU. This means that IRN and BRU are, separately, in the set of words that exists in Duolingo, that it chooses random tiles from.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElspethMac7

Would 'laddie' be accepted, instead of the rather brusque 'boy'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coiseam

Why is 'balach' slenderised at the end? Is that normal in the vocative case? I thought you only had to lenite? :S


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

See my comment to MathewMervue above. Masculine names and words get slenderised if possible. Feminine words and names do not. So Tormod - Norman becomes a Thormaid


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Highlander.Flori

This was wrongly pronounced "Tapadh leibh" and not (as I correctly thought so : "Tapadh leat") ... I thought: why does he say "Tapadh leibh" when he is talking to a boy - this is WRONG here !

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