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  5. "Chan eil Anna mòr."

"Chan eil Anna mòr."

Translation:Anna is not big.

November 27, 2019

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke_Langs03

So... basically, to negation of the verb "to be" is "chan eil", isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke_Langs03

Thank you for the link! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tha-seo-taghta

Yes. Though NB we use a different "be" for defining (as opposed to here for describing).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke_Langs03

Ah, ok, thank you. That's really similar to how Irish "bí" and "copula" (tá) work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AilaStuart33

Chan eil is a negative statement.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leo39.

Reaally enjoying Gaelic. Hopefully we will have more new language soon✌️


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hanabi906257

I wish Duolingo would add Finnish to their list!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CoolGrandp3

I think they did!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dojaduolingo

I’m trying to make a connection between Irish here (it makes it a lot easier). I’m assuming eil = fuil but I’m not really sure about chan, is it the same as ní (as in ní fhuil / níl = chan eil)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tha-seo-taghta

I don't speak Irish but "tha" is the positive form of "to be", and "chan eil" is the negative.

e.g. if it helps:

Tha mi sgìth = I am tired

Chan eil mi sgìth = I am not tired


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WilliamBen756880

Chan eil = níl / Tha = tá / A' bheil = An bhfuil


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlanS181824

It's easy to see our Irish 'Tá' in 'Tha' but 'chan eil'? Less as much! Maybe it's a longer variant of 'níl'?

For those examples we'd say:

'Tá tuirse orm' or 'Tá mé tuirseach' (I'm tired)

Or

'Níl tuirse orm' or 'níl me tuirseach' (I'm not tired)

Scíth (sgìth) also means tiredness in Irish too, but we don't use it like this! It's used more so to mean rest!

Didnt mean to derail this thread, i just love seeing the similarities between our languages!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/patbo

Some Ulster Irish dialects have "chan fhuil", too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vrodopachys

According to wiktionary, 'eil' is a contracted form of 'bheil' which is the dependent form of 'tha'. 'Chan' comes from the Old Irish 'nícon', an adverb of negation, according to eDIL, and "the second element -con is expld. as perfective particle com- (con-)"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NiallMulla3

Irish speaker who browsed this out of curiosity. 'Chan' is the Irish word for 'sang' xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/3hzi6

Sərt, lakin maraqlıdır


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucas608853

So you pronouce "ch" like a mix of h and y

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