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  5. "IRN BRU! Tapadh leibh a shea…

"IRN BRU! Tapadh leibh a sheanair!"

Translation:IRN BRU! Thank you, grandfather!

November 28, 2019

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beez448248

I am very curious who (or what?) IRN BRU is~ A gaelic inside reference? A gaelic secret society password?? The chief benefactor to the gaelic speaking world???

Love it regardless, the mystery and how it bounces out the mouth!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dufebag

Haha think it was invented a long time after the gaelic language...the scots love IRU BRU


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/caitlnk

Why is it WRONG without exclamation marks?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnEdding

Someone is REALLY excited about IRN BRU!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CIMacAonghais

Duolingo does not take punctuation into account. There must have been another error.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ana370235

Por qué se escribe leibh y no leat?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eclectic1234

contigo = leat; con usted = leibh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eclectic1234

The "r" at the end of "a sheanair" sounds like there's a "th" (English "th") sound in there. Is it just a breathy, tongue-flipped "r"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dubnowalos

That is how a slender r (i.e. one that is next to e or i in spelling) is pronounced in Lewis.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Azziawhite

What do you mean by Lewis


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deborah698429

Lewis is a Hebridean island


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gn2G7ko3

Granda for grandfather is correct in my area of Scotland


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mojojojoe13

As I understand it, the difference between "tapadh leat" and "tapadh leibh" is informal vs formal. The correct answer here uses the formal version. Why is speaking to family considered formal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

In Gaelic, it's normal to refer to all your elders using the formal, even your parents/grandparents/aunties/uncles etc. It would be seen as a bit disrespectful to use 'leat'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mojojojoe13

Makes sense! I didn't consider the elder angle since I was so focused on the family aspect. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

Easy mistake to make, many European languages would have you using the informal with older family members, but typically, Gaelic doesn't :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dalriada369

Typed in the exact answer coming up wrong, bug/glitch related??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spacecadet1957

Presumably. Flag questions when that happens so the devs can see it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RIK-6075

What does it taste like. Please keep the pronunciations. It's better than no pronunciations most of the time, like in the Irish course. Keep them


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marisabantjes

What is difference between tapadh leat and tapadh leibh?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ashmath.

@eclectic1234 says : leat = informal (tú/ti) leibh = respectful / formal for elders (usted)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/susan961004

When is seanhair accepted? And when do you add the "H"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Azziawhite

It's the vocative case here, since you're addressing the grandpa, yiu add the h.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AuntyMimmi

Why is Irn Bru several times at the beginning of the sentence? I know it's the other national drink in scotland, but why say it before wishing Grandda a good morning?


[deactivated user]

    Because in this sentence, your grandfather has just given you some irn bru and you are both surprised and appreciative


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FlakyRainbow

    I can't believe that somebody doesn't know about Irn Bru. I am from another edge of the world and I know.

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