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  5. "Is toil leam Seòras."

"Is toil leam Seòras."

Translation:I like George.

November 28, 2019

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coiseam

faclair has Seòrsa as a name for George as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stravaiger64

Faclair means 'dictionary'. They probably meant this one https://www.faclair.com/.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coiseam

sorry @Ollie_Ccf, yes.
that's the one I was referring to.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stravaiger64

The interesting thing about that dictionary is that when you click on an entry you'll get a map where you can see how many of its contributors reported that they knew the word/expression (and where are they based), so you'll see that while Seòras and Deòrsa are reported all over Gaeldom, Seòrsa has only two 'hits' at the Grampian region. https://www.faclair.com/HelpForMaps/index.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coiseam

Interesting.
Think one of the course writers just doesn't like Grampian speakers? :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

Seòrsa and Deòrsa are both accepted translations :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

Although Deòrsa in very unusual, except for kings of that name. Remember that one or two of them were very unpopular in Scotland.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UilleamTMa

it says my answer is wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheVeganBaker

What does the alternative "a Seorais (with the accent over the second a) mean??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

It does not mean anything that I know of. Where did you see it? You virtually never get an accent on an unstressed vowel in Gaelic (very different from Irish). The nearest I can think of is a Sheòrais, which is the way you address someone called George when you are talking/writing to them.

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