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  5. "IRN BRU agus siùcar."

"IRN BRU agus siùcar."

Translation:IRN BRU and sugar.

November 28, 2019

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScottWisem5

The way it should be. Original recipe all the way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

Dear god! Get this man a dentist!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Milnrowmart

That would be really toxic. Don't do this at home children.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alittleshaydy

Why? What does IRN BRU taste like?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caiteilein

Basically like orange cream soda with a bit of spice. It's already VERY sweet. I love IRN BRU. There's not really middle ground though. People either really love it or really don't love it. Haha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Milnrowmart

I am waiting to find out how to say "two deep fried mars bars, please."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Onyx.Rose

Well now that I know what it is, I’ll look for it in the import section of a supermarket.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dolly221870

I thought "IRN BRU" was like a place holder of random letters in the beta version. This course has been helpful for learning what IRN BRU is even if I learn nothing else!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gille5000

I loved it as a kid, I would have it when I visited my grandparents in Aberdeen. Tried it again recently and could only manage a few sips!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuckyCat746

Back to the original flavour!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VanyaTuche

This one makes me laugh. North American English uses 'and' idiomatically for 'with' - tea and milk, meaning tea with milk. Adding more sugar to Irn Bru would lead to a risk of tinneas an t-siùcair!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Onyx.Rose

....but not everywhere in North America of course, and where it does, not all the time. North America is one big place.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laura231289

Interesting. As a North American English speaker, I've never heard that usage for "and" before. I'd been interpreting these phrases as awkward, short shopping lists - never guessing this one meant "tea with milk". Am I alone in this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gazoonia

Why do they both pronounce agus and siùcar differently?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reidel8

yes....why??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ossiann_

It's due to them having different dialects/accents, both pronunciations are accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jay512758

No sound playing on this level

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