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  5. "Tha cèic blasta."

"Tha cèic blasta."

Translation:Cake is tasty.

November 28, 2019

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xor_expr

I like the word Blasta


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrancesHal13

Can this not mean the cake is tasty?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/idshanks

Not without an article in the Gaelic. Gaelic doesn't use indefinite articles, so it could be ‘cake’, or ‘a cake’ were context to permit, but not ‘the cake’.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

Exactly this. In English, cèic could be a cake or cake, but the cake would be a' chèic.

'The cake is tasty.' > 'Tha a' chèic blasta.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NiallMacGi

Is cèic a feminine noun and therefore takes a 'h'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dubnowalos

Cèic is indeed feminine. So 'a tasty cake' would be cèic bhlasta, if that's what you mean.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/colgav

how do I put in accents?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FareehahYoung

Hold on the particular letter on your keyboard. I'm not sure about what to do for laptops though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/3rUc1qLU

as asked before what is the difference with a accent above a word and one that has not


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EilidhMo

Mainly pronunciation. In this sentence the accent over the e makes ther sound longer: "Cèic" sounds lile caaake whereas "ceic" would be shorter like cake.

It can also change the meaning of a word: "bàta" - boat "bata" - walking stick

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