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  5. "Seall, Iain! Chan eil brioga…

"Seall, Iain! Chan eil briogais ort!"

Translation:Look, Iain! You do not have trousers on!

November 28, 2019

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaaikeZ.1

How do we know in this context it means YOU don't have pants on, and not I don't have pants on?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deedra4

Gaelic conjugates prepositional pronouns, so air (on) and thu (you) combine to make ort (on you). If it was I don't have trousers on it would be air + mi which makes orm (on me).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bhalaich

trousers not accepted !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

Trousers will always be accepted for 'briogais'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uU8l10

look Iain you don't have breechs on - breechs the Scots word for trousers (I'm Scottish) - perhaps my spelling of it is wrong as it's a word spoken rather than written.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaneyCKidd

It's 'breeks'! 'Breeks' pronounced with a hard 'c', not a 'ch' as in 'loch'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uU8l10

Indeed it is, and exactly how I say it - just my spelling that's wrong- Tapadh leat <3 Just like we say briogais (breekish) - just like the Gaidhlig.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pete670519

Similar to the English word "britches". Which is also not accepted :((

In America "britches" is considered a regionalism and generally associated with uneducated people, but is still in regular use in isolated areas. I don't know about British usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/d3vspvBt

"Britches" is an American word for trousers or pants. It probably derives from 'briogais,' since it's used in parts of the country settled by Scots and Scots-Irish.

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