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  5. "Thank you and bye, friend."

"Thank you and bye, friend."

Translation:Tapadh leat agus tìoraidh a charaid.

November 28, 2019

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HailToTheStud

Is the "a" before "friend" to denote we're talking to someone?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pete670519

Yes. And also for the same reason why caraid becomes charaid


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DancingLass

I hope we will learn soon why there is an "h" in "charaid".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

It's because caraid is in the vocative case here. When addressing someone directly, you use the vocative, so caraid becomes a charaid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaileagGoirid

Why leat and not leibh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iona_L

Leat is for adressing peers and younger people. It is also singular. Leibh is for adressing older people & a group of people Leibh is also seen as formal


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CIMacAonghais

If you are calling someone friend, you would be quite unlikely to use the formal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/calumblack7

Tapadh leibh agus beannachd, a charaid. ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/calumblack7

Tapadh leibh agus beannachd, a charaid. ?????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stephanie923511

Why the "a" before mother, father, friend, et.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dimbulb

Is the softness at end of 'charaid' meant to sound like a soft-g? Also, does 'caraid' and the Welsh 'cariad' (dear, loved one) have the same ancestor?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisBuck4

Both would appear to come from words meaning 'to love' - caru in Welsh and caraid in Old Irish

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