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  5. "Iasg agus buntàta."

"Iasg agus buntàta."

Translation:Fish and potato.

November 29, 2019

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tredontho

Should "Fish and a potato" also be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ollie-Benson

Yeah I think it should be at least. Was it marked as wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tredontho

It was marked wrong for me. I reported it, and later got a message saying it's now an accepted answer :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

Pity as it is wrong. Buntàta is an uncountable noun. Buntàta does not mean a potato any more than gaineamh means a sand.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tredontho

Good to know. How does one say "a potato", or is it just not possible?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

I was taught you say cnap buntàta 'a lump of potato', just like 'a lump of coal'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Agatha631151

Is that just in Gaelic? Potatoes is acceptable in the US


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

Yes. I am not aware of any other language apart from Gaelic - not even Irish - that has an always-uncountable word for 'potato'. Certainly I am not aware of any difference between dialects or relations of English in respect of 'potato'. Even though one, Ulster Scots, has a different word, pratie.

Of course there is always room for confusion with a word that can sometimes be uncountable (such as potato, once mashed). Having just looked up that word I find that the Ulster Scots singular, pratie, praty appears to come from the plural prátaí of the Irish práta 'potato', so it has to be re-pluralised (praties) if you want more than one.

And the Welsh, because of a feature unique to the Brythonic languages, have taken the English plural to make the Welsh plural tatws and then, because they do not recognise -s as a plural marker, they have had to construct their own singulative (as it is called) tatyn/tatwsyn.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/susan961004

Daibhidh,I just discovered that you have been replying to my guestions on e mail. I didnt know because I dont use e mail but I will use it for Duolingo! Thank you. (I was wondering how I was going to get my guestions answered?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

No. I have been replying on Duolingo. When anyone does that on an question that you have opted into you get an email. Whenever you post you automatically get opted in although you can change it either way if you want.

You should always click the link in the email to go to the discussion page, so you can see any other discussion, and so that any formatting works correctly. (Especially important on mine as I use a lot of formatting!) Also, I do my final proof-reading after posting (so I can see the formatting). Any updates will not be reflected in the email. The only value I can see to actually reading the email is

  1. If it just says 'thanks' you can ignore it.
  2. You can see how the formatting is actually done, and even read any censored words, if Duolingo is stupid enough to censor a word like hoe.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ifrinnsiol

In German there are buttons for diacritically marked vowels. Is this going to be added to Gaelic or do I have to figure out the keyboard shortcuts?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eclectic1234

Some exercises will have them and some won't. You won't be marked incorrect if you leave out the accents; you'll just be reminded of where they go.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HughieMcNe

In windows 10 you can add a Gaelic keyboard to do accents.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BobRamsay1

in windows 10 if you have the numeric keypad; use Alt and 0224 for à, Alt and 0232 for è, Alt and 0236 for ì , Alt and 0242 for ò, Alt and 0249 for ù


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HughieMcNe

Using the Gaelic keyboard just press alt, the accent key then the letter so it is quicker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

You can, but the UK extended is better if you have a UK keyboard, and English International if you have an American one. I assume the Gaelic keyboard is confusing if your keyboard is American (?) and these two do exactly the same in Gaelic, but cover a range of other languages as well.

You will need the instructions for which keys to press.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

They are there now! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dbhaidh

"Select the missing word" I selected the missing word ìasg. It marked me wrong with the following "Correct solution: Iasg" ???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tredontho

Iasg doesn't have an accent


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dbhaidh

Apologies, "ìasg" was a spelling slip-up when I sent message, it should have read iasg.......but it still doesnt explain why the "correct answer" gave me "lasg" with an "l". Or is this a typeface issue which makes "i" look like "l" in cap form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eclectic1234

Typeface. I don't understand why Duolingo doesn't use a better one. It's hard to see the difference between the accented and unaccented "i" as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dbhaidh

I agree. It is difficult with this typeface to distinguish between "i" and "ì" too. Maybe they will change it some day.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatrionaNicDhana

I can easily see the difference between accented and unaccented i. But capital i / I and l look identical in this font. I had to just guess which was which.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatrionaNicDhana

The font on this page has a different I and l. But not in the sans-serif used for the questions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

Agreed. I hadn't spotted they are different fonts but this one is definitely clearer.

To be technical, they are both sans-serif, though. This one appears to be (excuse my lack of expertise) called FF DIN Rounded LT Pro. This appears to be a descendent of FF DIN, which is described as a realist sans-serif font, with one of its distinguishing characteristics being a 'Lower-case L with a curl'. The facts that it is based on a German standard and is used for roadsigns and licence plates in many countries point to it being considered very clear and unambiguous. If only everyone used clear typefaces all the time.

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