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  5. "Cò às a tha thu Ealasaid?"

" às a tha thu Ealasaid?"

Translation:Where are you from, Elizabeth?

November 29, 2019

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

So is "who" but cò às means "where from"? Is that right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

You know I've never thought about that... But yeah, that's right!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

Native speaker right? Haha. Tapadh leat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

Yep! 'S e ur beatha :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

Question about your response: I referred to you as thu with leat but you referred to me as sibh with ur. Is there any usual practice with people you don't know online? I ask because in Welsh I think I'd tend to use ti (i.e. Gaelic thu) rather than chi (= sibh) here unless something in particular pointed out that someone was older than me. (Maybe it's because I assume everyone's a similar age or younger than me on Duolingo forums.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

No, I'm just over-polite. Na bi dragh ort! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

Ha, tapadh leat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

The rule is that you always use when it is followed by a preposition, translating 'what with', 'where from', etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

So when combined with a preposition, can mean both "what" and "where"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

Yes - or 'who(m)'. When followed by a preposition, it it best to translate with whatever interrogative sounds best in English, rather than trying to remember specific rules as to which you can or should use. The point is that it is general purpose in this situation, with no implication of animate/inanimate etc.

Of course it meant 'who' 'originally' as the o shows it is the same word, in the same way that cuin means 'when'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

Interesting. And helpful. Tapadh leibh!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Krysiulek

I am confused about "a tha" - what does the "a" do, and when should I use it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

The short answer is that it means 'that'.

Sentences always start with a verb so we can be certain that some verb at the beginning has gone missing and we can calque as

[Is] where from that are you?

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