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  5. "Me ne lavo le mani."

"Me ne lavo le mani."

Translation:I wash my hands of it.

November 30, 2019

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CivisRomanus

Me, because this mi is a reflexive pronoun, followed by the partitive clitic pronoun ne.
This causes a phonetic change of the vowel of the first pronoun: mi + ne → me ne (see also the table at the end of this discussion).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MT.italy

Ecco! :-/ Giusto la parte che non è contemplata... Mi sa che

"La favola non è finita".
;-D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CivisRomanus

Giusto la parte che non è contemplata...

In realtà dei pronomi combinati avevo già parlato un po' di tempo addietro, in quest'altra discussione. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MT.italy

Oops!
Grazie, questa me l'ero persa. :-P

Non è mica facile starti dietro, oh! :-D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RomancePhilology

It has nothing to do with mi being reflexive, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CivisRomanus

Lavarsene is a procomplementary verb, in which the first added pronoun is reflexive.
This does not mean that the verb takes a reflexive meaning. But if referring to the third person singular or plural, it is lavarsene. This indicates that also mi (referring to the first person singular) belongs to the set of reflexive pronouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RomancePhilology

It still has nothing to do with mi being reflexive. It would change into me even if it weren’t.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RomancePhilology

@MT.italy: To be honest, I have a hard time believing you’ve never seen mi being used nonreflexively. In fact, you’ve commented on a sentence that used nonreflexive mi: https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/4126621/Lei-mi-ama

The mi in the video you linked to is used as a subject pronoun (which is, of course, also nonreflexive).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MT.italy

:-D :-D :-D

È che... non riesco a levarmi "El Dindondero" dalla testa.

Comunque... è veneziano, non spagnolo. ;-P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CivisRomanus

It would change into me even if it weren’t.

Are you so sure?
For instance, speaking of a mirror (or, in a figurative sense, of a certain situation), how would you say "I see myself in it" (or "I picture myself", using the figurative meaning)?
Mi ci vedo (correct) or me ci vedo (wrong)?
And if you were to say, for instance, "in the plane's cargo my suitcase opened", would you say:
mi si è aperta la valigia or me si è aperta la valigia (wrong)?
In the first case it is a reflexive mi, in the second case it is an indirect object.

In my first comment I specified that mi in me ne lavo le mani is reflexive because in a different sentence the same pronoun in the same position could also be an indirect object.

That mi would change into me even if weren’t reflexive is a wrong statement. I just can't understand why you insist objecting on this. By doing so you are misleading learners, besides showing that you are not very confident with combined clitic pronouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MT.italy

Please ,RomancePhilology.
Can you give an example of using "non-reflective" MI?
Thanks in advance. :-)

I can only think of this:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RomancePhilology

It would change into me even if it weren’t.

Are you so sure?

Yes: Me ne ha dato uno.

For instance, speaking of a mirror (or, in a figurative sense, of a certain situation), how would you say "I see myself in it" (or "I picture myself", using the figurative meaning)?
Mi ci vedo (correct) or me ci vedo (wrong)?
And if you were to say, for instance, "in the plane's cargo my suitcase opened", would you say:
mi si è aperta la valigia or me si è aperta la valigia (wrong)?

Mi, ti, gli, ci, vi, and si only change whey they precede a clitic pronoun beginning with the letters l or n. As I’ve pointed out several times now, it has nothing to do with reflexivity.

That mi would change into me even if weren’t reflexive is a wrong statement.

Are you so sure?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sssoleee

This is actually the literal translation; if you hear this expression in an everyday speech it is a way to say "I don't care".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2302

Not really "I don't care", more "I don't want to deal with this", and I believe the English sentence can mean the same: https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/wash+my+hands+of

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