1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Scottish Gaelic
  4. >
  5. "Tha taigeis glè mhath."

"Tha taigeis glè mhath."

Translation:Haggis is very good.

November 30, 2019

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nightshadeb3rry

isnt this a pets section? why are we talking about haggis?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CIMacAonghais

This was actually a bit of a personal in joke, a lot of tourist tat in Scottish show the haggis as a real animal running round the hills.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teuchy5

We had the flying kind where I grew up (as opposed to the wee ground dwelling haggis you get in some parts).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

If you had a pet sheep, you could certainly use it to make haggis.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/E-Gaelic_Garlic-

"noanimalswereharmedinthemaking ofthiscoursedoulingoandallits constituantsarenotresponsibleforwhatpeopledowhileusingthiscourseall rightsreservedduolingollc©®™✓¶∆€¥¢£@#$&+


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnEdding

For me, this sentence came immediately after Tha uan agad.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

Tha taigeis agad a-nis.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tumblerose

Glè mhath...so Glayva is a play on words? Nicely done.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melissa240153

Is 'a haggis is very good' not acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spicy-Wolf

Is haggis countable in English? I was under the impression it was not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

It's both. It's traditionally made in a sheep's stomach, so it comes in countable lumps. But free of the casing, it's a vague gray uncountable substance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/E-Gaelic_Garlic-

What is the difference between "glè" and "gu"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

So, is the English "haggis" from a vocative, like Hamish for James?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sandra908885

No, look up haggis on Wikipedia, they discuss the origin of the word, sorry I don't know how to put a link from my tablet


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

The Wikipedia entry (at least the English one) only addresses the origin of the English word, and even then presents folk explanations by food writers. If the first English reference in 1430 predates the Gaelic, then the Gaelic word may come from the English. Clearly, going from h- or a vowel to t- can't be a Gaelic vocative. Could the t- be a consonant that wasn't originally part of the word? If the h- were not pronounced, would the definite form have been something like an t-haggis?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KittDunne

I think you're on the right track. The word would have been hacheiz or something similar in Old French; the h being silent, a t-prosthetic was added after the article which over time became understood as part of the word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sandra908885

"hachis" today is simply mince in French


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sandra908885

Somebody who knows more about the language will have to answer that, I'm just a learner!

Learn Scottish Gaelic in just 5 minutes a day. For free.