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  5. "Chan eil mi a' faicinn uan."

"Chan eil mi a' faicinn uan."

Translation:I am not seeing a lamb.

November 30, 2019

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BohemkaAlbion

Isn't 'I am not seeing a lamb' a literal translation rather than a translation into idiomatic English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tha-seo-taghta

Yeah it's a bit literal. It actually works in my Scottish English dialect, but in more standard English a better tx would probably be "I see/can see…".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

This is a discussion we had. It is the literal translation. The more 'idiomatic' I see is technically a different tense, but it will accept both translations


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tha-seo-taghta

It's the same tense (present) – it's that (apart from 'tha') there isn't a non-progressive form for the present tense in Gaelic.

I think accepting both is fine, but I reckon the main translation should be the more natural one. I've seen a few people remark on this now and it seems to be a bit confusing.

Just by way of feedback though, not a moan.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

By different tense I meant grammatical tense - present simple and present continuous. And don't worry, the feedback is very much appreciated :)

But yeah, I realised recently I see is obviously the correct way of translating it in this case - it's a stative verb. My head's in a bit of a bùrach at the moment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

Am I reading you right, caran-neonach? There is no non-progressive present tense in Gaelic? That's a real surprise for me, as I am used to seeing feicim, feiceann tú in Irish, alongside tá mé ag feiceáil. Where did Gàidhlig lose it's tense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dubnowalos

Some verbs, such as faic 'see', express simple present tense using what is normally called the future tense:

'I don't see a lamb' = Chan fhaic mi uan

'I'm not seeing a lamb' = Chan eil mi a' faicinn uan


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tha-seo-taghta

I don't speak Irish, but that is correct. The present tense is only expressed using the progressive, hence the translation challenge here. I've no idea where it lost it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/claragcbarbosa

Can someone please explain how a'faicinn is pronounced? I'm having so much trouble to reproduce the actual sound


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/E-Gaelic_Garlic-

I would say it is pronounced "uh f-aye-ch--keen" where "aye" is pronounced like the letter I, and "ch" is like in "bach", also "f-aye-ch" is one syllable and "keen" is another but the transition between them is pretty smooth

If anyone has a better way of explaining it please do so


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

I don't know if it's less common in British English, but in the right context, American English speakers certainly would use the present progressive here.

Say a group of people is looking across a field. Someone exclaims "hey, there's a lamb out there!" You scan the area; you don't see it, so you say "I'm not seeing a lamb."

Note that present progressive makes sense here: you are still looking, and you continue not to see it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/E-Gaelic_Garlic-

Ok, I finally understand what people mean when they say it is a natural sentence, but I don't think it's very common. I personally think it's good they translate it as "I am not seeing" because it shows you how the sentence works (why there is a "tha/chan eil" in there, etc.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jean564934

We never say, 'I'm not seeing' in Standard English. 'I can't see' which sounds a lot more natural, is accepted in other Duolingo courses, e.g. Ukrainian, even though it's not a direct translation.

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