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  5. "Welcome and thank you, frien…

"Welcome and thank you, friend."

Translation:Fàilte agus tapadh leat a charaid.

November 30, 2019

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris2301456

what dose the "A" need to be there for im confused?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SueMosher

When you address someone in Gaelic, you must use the vocative case, which is formed by using "a" except when the name begins with a vowel (like Anna and Eilidh and Iain). So, with the lenition that Maria_Annna describes above, if you are addressing Mairi, it becomes A Mhairi. And this is also how Seumas morphs into the anglicized Hamish -- because to address Seumas, you have to say, A Sheumais.

A friend describes the effect as making the form of address sound softer and more intimate. I have no idea if that has any historical validity, but it helps me remember the rules for vocative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicolastekar

good explanation! where are you from?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mangobird

Is "tapadh"=thank and "leat"=you, or does the phrase "tapadh leat" have a different literal translation but is used for thank you (sorta like "de nada" is used for "you're welcome" in spanish)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maria_Annna

Caraid is not a typo! :) Charaid is just a lenition of the word caraid and so both versions should be accepted as a proper translation of "friend".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

In this example though, you need to use the vocative case as you are directly addressing your friend. So it has to be a charaid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JennaAllen276469

When does one use "leat" and when does one use "leibh"? Sometimes it doesn't seem to matter and other times it does.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

"leat" = le + thu; you, singular "leibh" = le + sibh; you, plural & you, polite


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FhinnaghMi

how are you supposed to be able to answer the questions without having been introduced to the words int he first place? I find the teaching methods on this course very random! what do the words tapadh leat mean? this is the first time I have come across them. why not teach the words BEFORE asking you to translate them?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

This lesson is the first time 'tapadh leat' is introduced. If you hover over the word or phrase, it'll show you the hint.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FhinnaghMi

Thank you! I didn't know about hovering! That explains a lot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Essie94

I noticed a lot of commas missing in the translations to Gaelic. Are they not used/is it not common or is that just the course? For instance would it be grammatically correct in Gaelic to write "Fàilte agus tapadh leat, a charaid"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

Ah, no. Sadly they are typos that we can't fix at the moment. It'll get fixed one day, it's just low on the list of priorities at the moment :(

So yes, Gaelic does use the vocative comma as English does, it's just missing from the above sentence.

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