1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Scottish Gaelic
  4. >
  5. "Chan eil i fuar."

"Chan eil i fuar."

Translation:It is not cold.

December 2, 2019

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RosarioSoley

Question: listening to "fuar" and other words that end with R, I've heard different pronunciations. Sometimes it sounds "th", sometimes "t", sometimes "r", ha. Is it a matter of region/dialect or..?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GreumachTo

Maybe the difference will not seem as large as your fluency grows. When you learn other languages I find that you actually start to listen to speakers of your native language differently and you amaze yourself at how fluent you are in your own language! I think that's why even after learning a new language it's still difficult to speak on the phone, or speak with someone who's talking with their mouth full or someone has a different accent than it is to do those same things in your native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RosarioSoley

Hahah, totally!!! I love that, though, and I constantly notice it, be it English or Spanish. I looove nuances and voice inflections, those moments when speech becomes so loose and so much more human and authentic. Love love love :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GreumachTo

I think of the "it" we are talking about as refering to "sìde" (cf. "an t-sìde" = the weather) which is feminine. It's often like this in gendered languages when the noun is implied but absent from the phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EwanThomso4

Is the weather always refered to in feminine form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HughieMcNe

Yes, it is a feminine word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScottishDruid

Was wondering the same thing

Learn Scottish Gaelic in just 5 minutes a day. For free.