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  5. "Chan eil Iseabail à Muile."

"Chan eil Iseabail à Muile."

Translation:Isabel is not from Mull.

December 3, 2019

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moilleadoir

These sound files need normalisation. This one is too quiet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Operazzi1

Losing a mark for mis-spelling Isabel seems harsh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelDun951379

I visited the Isle of Mull, and Duart Castle. My mother is a McLean, and we got to meet and converse with Sir Lachlan. It was an amazing experience!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DebF26
  • 1206

How would you say "Is Isabel not from Mull?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

Nach eil Iseabail à Muile?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MollyMcCoo3

Is there any way to better understand spelling of first names? That's the only spot I mess up on and get a strike for. Her name is Isabel in English but Iseabail in ghaidlig?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

Helps a lot to learn the slender-to-slender, broad-to-broad rule -- slender happens high in the mouth, and is marked by the vowels i and e around consonants (palatized) Broad is low in the mouth, and is marked by the vowels a, o, u around consonants. And consonants will always have just slender vowels around them, or just broad. "Ise" is slender; "aba" is broad; "il" is slender. So Ise + aba + il. Consonants do different things when they're slender vs. when they're broad, and the unexpected stuff is mostly slender consonant combos. S becomes sh when it's slender, for instance.

So you'll never have the combo "isa" -- i is slender, a is broad.

And the other thing I do is ignore the pronunciation entirely, and just look for English words inside the Ghàidhlig ones: I sea bail. But be sure to remember the correct pronunciation if you do that!

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