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  5. "Ceud mìle fàilte a charaid!"

"Ceud mìle fàilte a charaid!"

Translation:A hundred thousand welcomes, friend!

December 3, 2019

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaylaKeith4

Is this a common phrase?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anndra20

You tend to find this on welcome signs to pubs and some places. It's not really a phrase that people use with each other. I've never heard it nor have I ever used it in conversation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silmeth

I believe so (though certainly stronger than simple fàilte). Think of it as you’re very welcome.

The Irish equivalent, céad míle fáilte, is certainly used there, and it appears in a traditional (and supposedly old, composed somewhere between 12th and 16th centuries) love song, Eibhlín, a rún, whose last verse (in the linked version sang in a different order) is:

Céad míle fáile romhat |

Eibhlín a rún | x2

Céad míle fáilte romhat

Fáilte ’gus fiche romhat

Naoi gcéad míle fáilte romhat

Eibhlín a rún

(A hundred thousand welcomes to you,

Eibhlín, my darling,

A hundred thousand welcomes to you,

Welcome and twenty (ie. 21 welcomes) to you,

Nine hundred thousand welcomes to you,

Eibhlín, my darling)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JiNeern

Is the sentence intonation always rising? It sounds unusual for me, I always use such an intonation in questions only but I hear it in all sentences here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anndra20

No, I wouldn't say it was. Gàidhlig is a very upbeat language and very "singing" like so, perhaps it comes across as that. Also, I think it's the way the words are being recorded.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

Having the accent always on the first syllable of the word makes speech very lilting and upbeat -- maybe that's what you're hearing as a rising intonation? (I've studied Scottish fiddle, and the speech rhythms are very like the music! Just look for "strathspey, fiddle" on YouTube!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CABBarra

This is what i wrote and it's saying wrong

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