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"C'erano nove delitti in un mese."

Translation:There were nine crimes in one month.

June 30, 2014

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheGandalf

Hah, "delitti" sounds like "delights". I'd call that a false friend.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chinmayhej

A major false friend!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darkpeak

I made the same mistake! delitto / diletto. I need an aide memoire!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jiglico

There is a "real friend" - delict. Maybe it's a legal term and not so common as "delight", but still.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darkpeak

DElinquent, DElitto. I'll try to remember that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartineHat

For those learning French, "un délit" is a minor crime.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sedona2007

But, in Italian, it is NOT minor: it often means murder or foul play. https://dictionary.reverso.net/italian-english/un%20delitto

un delitto d'onore = an honor killing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nima.en

Damien rice reference here. You tasteful owl!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rayzorblade23

But is that alright with you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/K2mission

"The were nine crimes in A month" was not accepted. Reported 2018-10-02


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoeMauro3

The ironic thing here is... "C'erano" was marked INCORRECT by DL in a previous "question"....

DUO can't make its mind up...( except to mark us wrong so often!!!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marygbaker

Why does this sentence use the imperfetto instead of "ci sono stati..."? I'm having such a hard time understanding when to use which past tense!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NicolsNani

I came to the comments section looking for this. The italian sentence does not make sense at all (unless in a very specific context). As a native Spanish speaker, the imperfetto is not complicated, but for English speakers this only causes confusion


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/feclips

Same here. I think this should be in the perfect tense since the time of the action is specified and is entirely in the past. A native speaker down the thread suggested the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Divsolps

As a native speaker I think that the "imperfetto" c`erano is wrong, ci furono sounds much better. Furthermore delitto is usually a homicide


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Graymac70

There were nine crimes in a month. Marked WRONG.? Somebody tell me what is the difference between 'a month' and 'one month'. If extra stress is needed on ONE month why not 'una mese'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoslynJS

There were nine crimes in a month = accepted Dec 2019.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KonradFrit

Not accepted April 2021


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnthonyDiNome0

what is the difference in italian between a month and one month


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrisaLand

I translated delitti as infraction, i think they should consider it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucafer92

They are quite differet: a "delitto" involves a murder, while an "infrazione" (we have this word as well) is something less serious and usually connected to a law or a code. E.g.: un'infrazione al codice stradale


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luxr33

imo delitti is more like a crime, an infraction (infrazione in italian) is different


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartineHat

I agree with you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kyle685468

What is the difference between "was" and "were" in this instance? I was maked wrong for translating "There was nine..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LynnSerafi

You cannot say "there was nine crimes" because "nine crimes" = plural. You need the plural for of the verb (were).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Viridiana504807

For Spanish speakers and learners "delito" is a crime


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Babiole

Is "delitto" as serious as a "crime"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucafer92

It is: the word "delitto" always involves a murder


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomFootb

I don't think so: In Belgium it is a smaller offence than a crime. That's why I asked it here: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/2149623


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DagoVago

I'm not a native english speaker but shouldn't «felony» be accepted as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LynnSerafi

"Felony" is used in the US specifically to describe a major crime, such as murder, bank robbery, etc. It isn't a word for crimes in general, and it isn't used here in the UK.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WarsawWill

It's a specific type of crime, and not used much in non-legal language. I've never heard it used in the UK.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoslynJS

"Felony" is not used in Australia, either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lolreally

As an Italian just passing here, doesn't the word delitto always involve a murder?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RayMcMoychuk

A New York nove delitti in un mese è niente.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielaCho449751

Why delicts are considered wrong when translating this sentence from English to Italian? Doesn't that mean the same as crimes?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phillip780217

There were nine crimes in a month. NOT Accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jtpwright

Obviously whoever made this sentence lived in Detroit.

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