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  5. "IRN BRU! Thank you, boy!"

"IRN BRU! Thank you, boy!"

Translation:IRN BRU! Tapadh leat a bhalaich!

December 3, 2019

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bdlove123

What is the difference between Balach and Bhalaich?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

Specifically, inflection for the vocative case (addressing someone). If it begins with a consonant, and that consonant can be lenited (b,c,d,f,g,m,p,s,t - or all except l,n,r) it is [balach -> bhalach], and the final consonant group is slenderized by the addition of an 'i' [bhalach -> bhalaich].

http://akerbeltz.org/index.php?title=Slenderisation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoDee111000

Okay, but when translating, the two words mean the same thing, yes? If not, what is the difference in meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dimbulb

They hold the same meaning, yes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Strindberg

when is it "leat" and when "leibh"? It`s not a matter of the gender of the noun?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraceFoste350455

Leat is singular and familar, something you'd use with friends, people younger than you, and the like. Leibh is plural and can be used as singular to infer respect, like if you were talking with elderly folk, teachers, your boss, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanW807787

I got it right with leat. I had the thought process of I was calling him boy, so it must be informal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ana370235

Why sometimes I use "a" and other is not necessary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silmeth

a here is a vocative particle, used when you address someone: a bhalaich ‘(oh), boy!’, a Sheumais! ‘oh, Seumas!’, etc.

But it disappears before a vowel, so eg. when you speak to Anna you just say Anna, not *a Anna.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mravawishes

If the word begins with a vowel, then it's omitted. Notice "tioraidh Anna" and "tioraidh a Becky".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maeveje

What does IRN BRU mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RosarioSoley

According to duolingo (computer, not phone app, it's a fizzy drink very common in Scotland?? I have no idea, I'm from Argentina, not Scotland, buut, Duolingo says, ha)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

The best selling soft drink in Scotland, and shipped worldwide for expats (aye, we miss it that much!).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonaldPaton

Scotland's other national drink! Soft fizzy drink in a can. In Scotland it's bigger than Coke. IRN BRU adverts are hilarious. I guess they must be giving Duo Lingo a bung!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lynne115582

Its braw. :0)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheLandingEagle

Everybody seems to be giving out irn bru


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniela444492

Kind of Scottish Coke then? What does it taste like?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IcyTwinkle

First time I drank it, I would have described it as 'sweet, sweeter, chemical'. (it was super overload to my taste buds) Its bright orange in colour too. Other than that, it's hard to describe it, it doesn't taste like anything natural (like lemons) , but also not like anything else I could compare it to? It's a distinctive taste though, a bit like an energy drink.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob523788

Is there no "please" in Gaelic?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cheunglauren

I wish I shared his enthusiasm lol

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