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https://www.duolingo.com/KieranLillis

Spanish question word order

I've never really understood the word order used in questions in Spanish. Can anyone explain this to me or link me to a website that does. Thanks.

4 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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Hi, Kieran. Spanish word order is very flexible in questions. Basically, sticking an inverted question mark at the beginning and a regular one at the end makes it a question (but this can't be used for everything). Here is more information: http://spanish.about.com/od/sentencestructure/a/ask_question.htm.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KieranLillis

Gracias, eso ayudó mucho! (is this right?).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lauryswagner
lauryswagner
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I'm pretty sure for the most part it's the same as English... "¿Puedes darme una manzana?" (can you give me an apple), "¿vas a estar en tu casa pronto?" (will you be at your house soon) If you give me a specific example that doesn't follow this pattern maybe I can explain it. Although, English does make use of the helping verb "do" a lot... As in "do you like oranges?". In Spanish you wouldn't say "do" but rather just have a questioning tone to your voice as you say "¿te gustan naranjas?" I hope this helped!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

You are right. Just a little correction: ¿te gustan las naranjas? ;]

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KieranLillis

In Spanish, does a plural noun always (or at least most of the time) still have a definite article?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

It does when it is the subject of a gustar sentence

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KieranLillis

Gracias

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-Katrina.-
-Katrina.-
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All I know for sure is the adjectives and the word described by the adjectives are switched. For example, if the English is "blue car" it would be either "carro de azul" or "carro azul" (I think the first one). Hope this helps!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

True! Except with few exceptions, adjectives go behind the noun, but in your example, it is actually the second one ;] "Carro azul" = "Blue car".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KieranLillis

I thought 'coche' meant car, or is this another way of saying it? Which one is more common?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lauryswagner
lauryswagner
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Coche is common in Spain, in Latin America they say "carro" or "auto"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KieranLillis

Gracias

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fsouthern
fsouthern
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I heard "coche" many times in Mexico, for what it's worth.

4 years ago