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"No tienes que esperar."

Translation:You must not wait.

5 years ago

80 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/msscuddybuddy

Why isn't this "You don''t have to wait."?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikebrill

Of course it can - error on Duolingo's part

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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It accepted "You don't have to wait". It doesn't show any other translation in the header of this discussion.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

I put in "You don't have to wait," which it marked correct, but then showed, as an alternate translation, "You must not wait," which I'm pretty sure is wrong. "You must not wait" would be "Usted no debe esperar."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Defaulto1

"You must not wait" is correct. "Tiene que" means "you have to" but it also expresses "you must." If you proceed it with "No" (No tiene que) then you are saying "you must NOT."

This is one of the differences between Spanish and English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/guomashi
guomashi
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then what is the difference in spanish between "you must not..." (i.e. not allowed) and "you don't have to...." (i.e. not necessary).

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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According to this article, https://www.espanolavanzado.com/28-uso-de-palabras/494-no-tiene-que-por-que, "no tener que" usually means "don't have to", but it can also mean "must not".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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Seems like it can be both to me.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fabb
fabb
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Can it? Isn't "you must not" the same as "you are not allowed to"? (no native english)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"Must" and "have to" mean almost the same in English.

But "must not" and "don't have to" are very different.

"You must not do it" means it is important that you do not do it.

"You don't have to do it" means you can do it or not do it, it doesn't matter.

So "must not" creates a reverse obligation, while "don't have to" removes the obligation.

Edit: Sorry, I just re-read your question. Yes, "you must not" and "you are not allowed to" mean the same.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tbvjshqk017

I guess 'must not' means that you are not allowed to do something, you're prohibited from,

'don't have to' means that you are not obligated to do something or it's not necessary for you to do something.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Right.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynnecover

That is what I said today, July 8 and it was marked correct.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/indigobloom

Oct 10 here and it marked me wrong for that answer :/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vietnam
vietnam
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It is correct, so either Duolingo updated it, or because you put 2 apostrophes. It should be don't, not don''t.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soreIIina
soreIIina
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Yeah i write The same

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/genshe

"You don't have to wait"... accepted January 10, 2015

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasonSublime

Well its back to not accepting it on july 20 2017.. ??

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/57flora

I believe like tego que = i must Tienes que = you must

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1160347640

This is my observation also. The translation should be, "You don't have to wait."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aotoolester

You must not, and you don't have to, are very different meanings in english. I don't think both should be accepted. It should only be "you don't have to wait"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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Tony, do you have a reason for this? I am sure i was told the opposite (i.e. must not... is the meaning) but if you have a source...?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Greg349511

'no tener que' in Spanish usually means 'don't have to' ('it's not necessary') but it can also mean 'mustn't.'

In summary:

In English: 'have to' - obligation

'don't have to' - lack of obligation (e.g. you can if you want but it's not necessary)

In Spanish: 'tener que' - obligation ('have to')

'no tener que' - lack of obligation (don't have to) OR prohibition (mustn't)

So in Spanish 'No tienes que esperar.' could be 'You don't have to wait.' [but you can if you want] OR 'You mustn't wait. [you're not allowed to]' depending on context. The former (don't have to) would be more likely, however without any context given.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cazort
cazort
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This is tricky!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thepkl

tener que in any grammar book is to have to.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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But does "no tienes que esperar" mean "you must not wait" or does it mean "you can wait or not wait, it's ok either way".

In English, "have to" means "must" but "don't have to" does not mean "must not".

obliged to = must = have to

not obliged to = don't have to

obliged not to = must not

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Previously, only DEBER was translated as "must."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

You must not wait= no debe esperar Talca, again, I'm just guessing...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TigerRoar1

shouldn't it also mean "you must not hope“?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amuzulo
amuzulo
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I also thought this could also mean "You don't have to hope." How would you say that then in Spanish?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luko.
Luko.
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"No tienes que tener esperanza"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Not quite. That may communicate the same idea, but it is not a proper translation. While I'm in no position to pass judgement on the grammar, I believe you meant, "You don't have to have hope." That isn't the same sentence. In Spanish, you most definitely could say, "No tienes que esperar," since esperar also means to hope (as well as expect, anticipate, etc.).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

"You don't have to wait" means you can wait but you don't have to, but "you must not wait" means you cannot wait. The two sentences do not mean the same thing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aathompson43

Wait... so I CAN hurry love?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kkayda
kkayda
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Re: deber vs tener que. My research shows that Deber de + inf. verb = possible, supposed, conjecture, belief. Deber + inf. verb = obligation, strong likelihood, often = must. Deber + direct object usually = owe. Tener que is stronger than deber . Tener que mas remedio que = absolutely has to. Hope this is some help.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bootsy113

You must not wait seems like it should be wrong. I just had to type what i heard, but the only correct translation it listed was 'you must not wait.' This should mean 'you dont have to wait.' They mean very different things in English. :/ (10.19.15)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/.Linguo.
.Linguo.
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I answered "You don't have to hope". Seems like that should be acceptable i.e. Espero que tu aceptes mi respuesta

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

I agree. No one said these phrases/sentences have to be common or even make a great deal of sense without any context. So, translating esperar in terms of hope is perfectly valid. Moreover, if you use the "You must not hope" construction, then you have a very sensible and even somewhat common English sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jambalaya69

Why not 'You don't NEED to wait' also?

I was taught 'Tengo que...' is 'I need to...' (obligation/expectation/loose requirement)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ngmuipai
ngmuipai
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"Must not" and "don't have to" are different in English, agreed. But can you translate the former as "no tienes que..." and the latter as "tienes que no..."? "No tienes que esperar"="you don't have to wait." "Tienes que no esperar"="you must not wait." Correct Spanish???

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I'm pretty sure that "no tienes que" means "you don't have to". (Even though the official Duolingo translation is "you must not".)

I don't think it's valid to put the "no" between "tener que" and its infinitive. I think you have to put the "no" before the whole compound verb (I'm sure I read that somewhere, but I can't find it now).

But if it were valid, I think "tienes que no esperar" would mean "you have to not wait", which means "you must not wait".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lindisfarne

But 'you don't have to wait' and 'you must not wait' mean different things in English. How do you make that distinction in Spanish?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kkayda
kkayda
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For me, that was a big question. At learn-spanish-online.com, they say: 1) Instruction or advise - tener que (must) ie: You must read this book 2) Prohibition - no deber (must not) ie: You must not drink this 3) External obligation - tener que ( have to) ie: You have to work if you want to buy it 4) Moral obligation (with some room to manoeuver), to ask for instruction - deber (shall) - You shall honour your parents/ Shall I put the plates here? 5) Duty, assumption & advise - deberia/tendria que (should or ought to) - I should go to work/You should be more careful. In the negative, no deberia only - You should not stay here 6) Affirmative - hacer falta que (need to). I need to go home now 7) Not need to - no hacer falta que. He didn't need to do it 8) Not have to - no tener que - I don't have to swim today. Not sure how a Spanish speaker would answer your question, though.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nina1657

A very thorough explanation. Much appreciated. Thanks also for the heads up on the website :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatricioJiang

This is the oldest lingistic battle in the world, "May", versus "Can". Knowing when to use which is a subjective idiom.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

True. "Shall" in the US is a legal term means no matter what, it has to happen (or not happen) or there will (shall) be consequences. You still though have the ability to do or not do it. This isn't new. The Ten Commandments state "Thou shall (shalt) not" rather than You can not or may not. "May not" is subject to various objectivity. I can say "You may not." That doesn't mean you don't have the ability or are in the position to get the action done anyway. "You can do it" is something that can get done whether someone states "You shall" or "You may". Someone can say to me "You shall fly" or "You may fly" but I know I can't. It's a fine line and languages change. Gotta love DL

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GruvTrain

Why can't it be "You can't wait"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/k-kayak

That would be "No puedes esperar."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stacy356

I agree. "You cannot wait" is the opposite of "you have to wait".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"must" and "must not" imply that there's a rule about whether you're allowed to wait or not.

"cannot" implies that it's not possible to wait.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nina1657

I would have thought "you don't have to wait" would be the opposite?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/langladder

You do not have to wait is the apt translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

BarbaraMorris and Raahiba, thanks for the clarification!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/james.ray1
james.ray1
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I am guessing that this is another example where the sentence can have multiple meanings--in this case: "you do not have to wait" and "you must not wait". And the meaning would be dependent on the tone of voice and context.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/james.ray1
james.ray1
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OK. Other comments have said the same thing: "Usted no debe esperar." would "you must not."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CNyE
CNyE
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Interesting. I put "You should not wait", which would conversationally mean the same as "you must not wait" and it was marked wrong... would appreciate opinions from someone who is better informed than I.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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As far as we can tell (see other comments in this discussion), Duolingo is wrong to say it means "must not". It looks like Spanish is the same as English: "tener que" and "have to" both mean "must", but the negation of "tener que" and "have to" just means "it's not necessary to".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CNyE
CNyE
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thanks. That makes sense

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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Barbara, my understanding is the opposite - they both have the prohibitive meaning - you must not... This makes more sense to me esp with no debe. If you think of tener que being a phrase equiv tto the modal verb deber then i agree they should be the same just not what that should be! My view is that the meaning of the negation 'you do not have to...' is the anomaly.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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That's starting to be my understanding too. Sort of. See my 5-months-later comment starting "I have been wondering about this too".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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hI bARBARA. tHESE THREADS GET SOMEWHAT CONFUSING. i AM SURPRISED WE ARE ALL BLUNDERING AROUND AND NO sPANISH SPEAKING COLLEAGUE HAS WEIGHED IN WITH A DEFINITIVE RULING! Uh, uh, Caps Lock was on, can't re-type it now....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/divaluisa
divaluisa
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It seems both translations are acceptable. But in English they mean something totally different. Just something new to learn.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thanyarus
Thanyarus
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So eventually this sentence expresses a lack of obligation, NOT a prohibition, right?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I have been wondering about this too, and every time I google it, I get more confused. From this discussion http://forum.wordreference.com/threads/no-tener-que-esperarme.1280027/ it sounds like it can mean both, maybe depending on region.

So many of the discussions about this on the web have Spanish speakers saying things like "no tener que" means "don't have to", which doesn't necessarily solve anything since they might not be clear about what "don't have to" means. It would be better if all the explanations were done in terms of obligation and prohibition.

I'll always remember a French professor shouting at us, in English, "You DON'T HAVE to turn in your papers late".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thanyarus
Thanyarus
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Thank you for your reply and for your story about the French professor :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nina1657

Hi Barbara (and anyone else on this discussion). Would you say "don't wait" is not sufficiently emphatic a translation?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Whether it's emphatic enough depends on the tone of voice. It doesn't necessarily mean "must not", it could just be a suggestion.

Aside from that, I suspect that "Don't wait" doesn't really qualify as a "translation". I think it's more another possible way of expressing the same idea.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nina1657

Thanks :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babsdy
babsdy
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i think the real meaning of this sentence is like in italian " non devi far altro che aspettare" and this is the opposite of the duolingo's translation. It could be translated in " you have nothing else to do than wait"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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That's "No tiene nada que hacer sino esperar". I think the Italian for "No tienes que espertar" is something like "Non c'è bisogno di aspettare" or maybe "Non si deve aspettare".

In Spanish, "tener que" means "have to" which means "must". (What we're wondering in a few threads in this discussion is whether "no tener que" means "don't have to" or "must not".)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babsdy
babsdy
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Tanks for your explanation. I often confuse spanish with my italian because of the similar words, so I was wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/divaluisa
divaluisa
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I always thought "tener que" simply meant to have to. You don't have to wait. "Must not" should be "no debes esperar" It's strange, in the negative, "you don't have to wait" is different from "You must not wait". But in the positive: "You must wait", and "you have to wait" are very similar in English. Correct me if I'm wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joe452531

DL throwing a wobbly. It spoke the sentence itself, didnt wait for me, then marked itself wrong !?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bhaynes1

I had that happen recently too. reported it

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andiness1

Spanishdict.com translates "no tener que" as "not having to" rather than "must not." Every site i found that mentioned "no tener que," and trust me, there weren't that many, translated it the same way. "Must not" is indeed "no deber"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huw126929

Agreed regularly duo lingo uses necessitar for must and only translates tener que as have obviously that has changed

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tlokken

I was thinking, no you can't wait. ( as in you have to try another time)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DennisKayK

I think this should be" You do not have to wait. "

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roberto_de1
roberto_de1
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A victim. AbAvsZAAnmsSaaA ,aAzvAZ kvvnnb n

2 months ago