"Pensiamoci su domani!"

Translation:Let's think about it tomorrow!

4/26/2013, 12:22:44 AM

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/sapolion
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How do you distinguish "Let's think about it tomorrow!" from "Let's think about tomorrow"?

11/3/2013, 2:59:35 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/f.formica
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"Let's think about tomorrow" would be "pensiamo a domani".

11/3/2013, 3:31:30 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/arekolek
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Then how do you distinguish "We think about tomorrow" from "Let's think about tomorrow"?

4/25/2014, 6:35:30 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/fsufezzik
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I'm pretty sure you don't; I believe those sentences are identical in Italian. I believe the sense would usually be clear from context.

5/1/2014, 3:26:00 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Duolessio
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Yeah, I can't do anything more than this:

Pensiamo a domani. Pensiamo a domani!

4/10/2016, 12:50:51 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/jruota
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Intonation.

7/22/2017, 4:31:17 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackie.Bowers

Why isn't this "Let's think about each other..."?

4/26/2013, 12:22:44 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/f.formica
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Because of "su"; it's idiomatic, "pensarci su" just means "to think about it". "Pensiamoci domani" would have both meanings, although the first that comes to mind would be "let's plan/do it tomorrow".

4/26/2013, 2:26:18 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/johnrush

I understand: in American English, to "think on" something; in Italian, "pensarci su."

12/18/2013, 7:18:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MrMrsCoupl

It's used in parts of England too.

8/21/2018, 8:36:12 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelWat541241

i translated it as "let's think about it until tomorrow" but it was marked wrong

2/3/2015, 4:38:40 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackie.Bowers

Yikes! But thanks.

4/28/2013, 2:38:07 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkLerno
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The audio seems a bit suss. Shouldn't the stress fall on the a in 'pensiamoci' rather than on the o?

1/5/2015, 2:49:20 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/HeruMornie
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Yes, the stress is on the "a".

10/13/2015, 11:41:00 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ion1122
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If I understand correctly, the 'us' is already contained in the word 'pensiamo' = 'let us'. The 'ci' here does not refer to 'us'; rather, it is a particle meaning 'of it' or 'about it'. The 'su' here means 'on'. So, literally, 'let us think about it on tomorrow'. Please correct my analysis if it is wrong.

3/11/2017, 9:14:37 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/IARose
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All rather Shakespearean isn't it? The literal translation being : "Let's think of it on the morrow"

8/8/2014, 6:03:03 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
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Exactly what came to me in reading it

5/13/2017, 8:46:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ferrimed

What a perfect sentence for a learning course of language!!! and all that without any clue or grammar support. Bravo DL!!!

10/12/2014, 11:09:38 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/silkwarrior

Is the "su" optional? ie - could it just be "Pensiamoci domani!" ????

5/2/2014, 12:54:26 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Darlingtinho

No, because according to f.formica, the "su" makes it an idiomatic expression. So, if you take away the "su", it'll simply mean "Let's think about ourselves tomorrow".

6/4/2014, 9:25:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Duolessio
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"Pensarci su" is definitely idiomatic, but ci can mean both "each other" and "about it". So the answer to silkwarrior's question is "Yes, it could".

I feel relieved I am Italian and I don't have to learn this... Our language is crazy.

4/10/2016, 12:57:43 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/HeruMornie
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Well, a bit crazy, but beautiful and I always find delightful to learn it. Perhaps I am crazy, too :D

4/11/2016, 9:03:23 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ErikPoloni
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Sorry, but whay does this "ci" mean? Wasn't it "us"? I'm confused

1/10/2017, 1:10:46 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
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as f.formica said above 4 years ago, "Because of "su"; it's idiomatic, "pensarci su" just means "to think about it". "

5/13/2017, 8:48:33 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ion1122
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The 'us' is already contained in the word 'pensiamo' = 'let us'. The 'ci' here does not refer to 'us'; rather, it is a particle meaning 'of it' or 'about it'. The 'su' here means 'on'. So, literally, 'let us think about it on tomorrow'.

8/21/2018, 10:29:48 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
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The troll of Duo seems to at work here, handing out random down-arrows. Whenever I see that happening, I give an up-arrow.

5/13/2017, 8:51:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
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Note to non-English native speakers: "Let's" is one if the few words in English where the contraction is almost always used. About the only phrase I can think of which uses "Let us" is "Let us pray/give thanks" - a formal invocation or request used very infrequently except in churches or where an opening prayer is giving by a speaker at a gathering of people.

5/13/2017, 8:53:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/StanleyZiv
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Let's think ON it, is definitely grammatically and colloquially correct and means the same, even if slightly less common.

2/5/2016, 12:37:24 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/jcarellanoc

DL is wrong on this one. "Su domani" means "about tomorrow". "Pensamoci domani" would be let's think about it tomorrow.

3/31/2016, 11:12:45 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
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How would you say, "Let's think about us tomorrow"?

6/30/2016, 6:01:39 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
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I can answer my own question now: "Pensiamo a noi"

Pensiamoci seems to have a default meaning of "Let's think about it" - except I just ran across pensiamoci ogni sera, which Duo translate as "Let's think about each other every evening".

So, I still am not certain about pensiamoci, although the limited context of the exercise sentence and the sentence I cite here do suggest that "it" is more likely in the exercise, and "us" is more likely in the sentence I cite.

5/13/2017, 8:50:33 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Keith352848

Pensiamoci su domani = Let's think about it tomorrow. Pensiamoci ogni sera = Let's think of each other each evening. Would somebody please just throw me a bone and agree how absolutely absurd that is?!

7/19/2018, 5:54:24 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ale901809

How do we know when the "ci" means "it" or " ourselves" ?

7/25/2018, 3:13:04 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ion1122
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We don't always know for sure. We have to rely on context in some cases.

7/25/2018, 4:32:49 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamM.G
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La pensiamoci su domani == why not this?

1/29/2019, 4:36:06 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ion1122
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The verb already has an ending -ci that means "of/about it". So you don't need a "la" as well, and it is incorrect to add it.

The Italian verb by itself, "pensiamo", is not transitive. That is, it does not take a direct object such as the pronoun "la".

To put the matter another way, you don't say (in English or Italian) "We think it". It must be "We think ABOUT it". The Italian "-ci" means "about it", whereas "la" means just "it".

1/29/2019, 9:53:07 PM
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