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"Ventus iratus per villam perflat."

Translation:The angry wind blows through the villa.

December 4, 2019

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Macjory

At times it seems that 'per' (through) is implied by the verb 'perflat,' and at other times, the preposition 'per' (through) must be added. Can someone explain when it is implied, and when it must be added?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noahgamerrr

Since when does a wind have feelings?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pye20

Personification • a literary device:

Angry seas, friendly seas, vicious storm, fair winds, The cheerful / gloomy sky; the biting cold, bitter cold; the oppressive heat, a joyful rain, a desolate winter, a comforting snow


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Larry_Porter

Because "per" in Latin is an intensifying prefix, the sentence should be translated as "The angry wind blows throughOUT the house." Compare "perterreo", meaning "to scare the hell out of."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Macjory

Thanks! 'Perterreo' => my new favorite word!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SianWillia828764

Surely villa has been acceptably translated as 'house' in previous lessons?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidDKleiner

Indeed it has, and "the angry wind blows through the house" is accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CrowCuss

Tried "throughout the villa" and still not accepted. 02/29

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