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"Wir tragen den Tisch in den Garten."

Translation:We are carrying the table into the garden.

April 26, 2013

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jalnt

Isn't "Garten" dative here? Why is it not "dem Garten"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erikman

If it was 'dem,' it would imply that they were carrying it around in the garden. 'Den' means that they were bringing it into the garden from some other location. German uses 'in' to mean both 'in' and 'into,' so the only way to clarify the meaning is the case used for the direct object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulx589

Why accusative?

Danke.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Levi
  • 2599

Or try understanding it this way:

When motion is implied (we carry the table from A to B) then it's accusative. When a specific place is meant (I am in the garden) then it's dative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/votears

Is this a rule borrowed from latin I might ask? like Sub mare and sub mari.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Levi
  • 2599

Hmm, I don't know Latin so I don't know what to say.
2014.12.30


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maryli110732

Because if we have the question Wohin? - its dativ, if respond on question Wo? - its accusative


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Herbstzeitlose-

Generally you use accusative for the direct object and dative for the indirect object.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accusative_case#German


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stefanosy

Try asking the helpful questions "wo" (where, implies place/position) and "wohin" (where to, implies movement) to understand whether the case is Dative or Akkusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slendro

Why wouldn't "We are taking the table to the garden." be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erikman

'Carrying' implies a certain method of taking (as opposed to 'driving,' 'dragging' etc.), and ion this case 'tragen' means 'carry.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChepLendrum

I agree with slendro. My "webster's New World German/English" dictionary has 'to carry" and "to take" as the first 2 definitions of tragen. Furthermore, if you look at an English thesaurus, "carry" and "take" are synonyms. Though I agree to carry is a more specific method of taking, but in daily usage, (at least for American English), to carry the table and to take the table to the garden would mean the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scolombano

Why is "bring the table" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ViArSkoldpaddor

See the above comment. Carrying is not the same action as bringing. tragen means carrying, bringen means bringing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmirkhanSofronov

Why is it "in" and not "zu"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrockHorn

I think because it would trigger the dative case if it were zu


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scolombano

Why is "bring the table" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ryungf

Can "Wir tragen den Tisch nach den Garten." be correct?

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