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  5. "Tha an t-uisge ann."

"Tha an t-uisge ann."

Translation:It is raining.

December 6, 2019

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuckyCat746

What would "there is rain" be? Is it different? The "an" is confusing me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tha-seo-taghta

This would translate as that also.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuckyCat746

is tha uisge ann just water and then that an t-uisge ann is rain?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tha-seo-taghta

Yes, uisge is water.

an t-uisge = literally "the water", but in context would be understood as "rain"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trina987052

What does "ann" mean exactly and in what cases is it used?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

Sort of "there is" or "is there," or "is present." Seems a lot like the German "es gibt." See the tips & notes here: https://www.duolingo.com/skill/gd/Rain/tips-and-notes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob523788

Why do we have the "an"? I thought it would be "tha t-uisge ann"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

If I recall, the whole phrase an t-uisge (=the water) with the article an is an idiom for “rain.”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maskedmallard537

Is the t in t-uisge supposed to sound like a p?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

No, it’s a /t/.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GilianAitk

She really does make it sound like a p even when you know it's not and listen again. Definitely making the sound of a p. I wonder why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/I2cGAc67

I am clearly hearing her pronounce an English "gr" sound rather than a "t"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/susan961004

Thank you Duolingo for letting me get away with a lot a miss spellings. I will not complain about your mistakes againn!


[deactivated user]

    so why doesn't "it is raining out" count as a correct english translation for this? Doesn't the "ann" mean "out"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

    You would need to add a-muigh to the end of the sentence.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R.Gray-MacColin

    A-muigh means out; the ann here seems to add the sense of "there is"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akhzarukhazad

    Is this idiomatic? Because it looks like it should mean "there is the water/the water is there". Could someone please explain?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biggiantcircles

    This is literally translated as "There is rain." That should be an acceptable answer besides "It is raining."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

    That will be accepted here.

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