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  5. "'S e ur beatha, Ealasaid agu…

"'S e ur beatha, Ealasaid agus Alasdair."

Translation:You are welcome, Elizabeth and Alasdair.

December 6, 2019

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

You are welcome (It is my pleasure) You are welcome (Come in and sit down).

Which is it? Apparently, it's the first. "Don't mention it" "No problem". But the little translation ("It's your life") doesn't help with that at all. I guess it's just another idiom.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tj4234

The first one. Second one would use fàilte.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tha-seo-taghta

As in "it's my pleasure". I'm sure answered this question for you before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnEdding

Isn't beatha translated as pretty?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

There are two similar words for 'pretty': bòidheach and brèagha. I think it is just chance that beatha looks like a mixture of the two.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnEdding

Bòidheach? Hmmm... now I'm curious about the etymology of the word bodacious.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MadisonH96

As someone else pointed out, brèagha is the word for pretty. Beatha actually means "life", 'S e ur beatha literally means "it is your life."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RussellDornan

I thought translating the names into English or Gaelic was fine? Marked wrong for writing "Elizabeth", but thenother way around we're encouraged to translate


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

Elizabeth in the English version is fine. So something else must have gone wrong.

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