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  5. "Mar sin leibh a sheanair."

"Mar sin leibh a sheanair."

Translation:Goodbye, grandfather.

December 9, 2019

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jinty92

Interestingly some dialects in the Outer hebrides will pronunce the s. So it sounds like a sshen-urr


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jacek100686

Wait, looking at the exact words, it means "so with you" or something, thats cool


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/syntyche1981

Please explain, wonderfully helpful native speakers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moilleadoir

Only a learner, but what is your question?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrandonPoe10

Could someone please explain the difference in using leat vs leibh in this greeting? Tapadh leat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter346048

leat = singular/informal and leibh = plural/formal. Because the sentence is addressing a grandfather, the formal version is used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivitcyex

In this case you use leibh to show respect to your grandfather.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LachlanDuf3

from what I know, leibh is either for plural or formal. so tapadh leibh is for saying goodbye ya'll or speaking to elders and whatnot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anne93052

Why does 'Mar sin leibh, a sheanair' have an 'a' but 'Mar sin leibh, athair' doesn't please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moilleadoir

It’s just hard to say two vowels like that, so it’s left out when a vowel follows.

In Irish it’s often left in, but maybe more confusingly, not pronounced!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Connor47091

Any difference between this and "tíoraidh a sheanair"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/docv_73

I thought it said in the notes, that "mar sin leibh" is from an older traditional greating. They would say goodbye as "blessings go with you," and this was a reply to that, meaning "with you also" so it's morphed over the years to become a more formal way to say goodbye, whereas "tìordaid" is like just casually saying goodbye.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akhzarukhazad

I think that "tìoraidh" is the more informal farwell. Like saying "bye" instead of "goodbye".

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