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  5. "Goodbye, father."

"Goodbye, father."

Translation:Mar sin leibh athair.

December 9, 2019

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/icecheetah2

"Mar sin leat/leibh" means 'the same to you'. It was originally a resposne to "Beannachd leat/leibh", which means 'blessings be with you'. But lately people have just been saying 'mar sin leat/leibh' back and forth and it... sounds a bit awkward to me personally. (I'm a skye gàidhlig speaker)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eilidh19845

I was told by a young chap that only little old ladies say Beannachd leat, so I replied that I AM a little old lady, so I do use it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tha-seo-taghta

Literally yes, but it's definitely come to idiomatically mean "farewell". I think it's a wee bit much for casual conversation though. It's the kind of thing you'll hear e.g. radio presenters sign-off with.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/icecheetah2

But for casual conversation we have "Tìoraidh".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaVanc

I thought the same thing, but I think that just means "bye" and not "goodbye". Tìoraidh mhath?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eilidh19845

I know. Most confusing. It's used like "see you!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brad930596

A question for any of the native Gaelic speakers that read these. Would you use sibh forms with your parents? Or thu forms? Tapadh leat or tapadh leibh? I speak Spanish and while there are a few dialects of Spanish that sometimes use the formal with parents, generally tú is used within the family. Just wondering how different it is, or if it's also regional.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zSharp2

Why isn't this translated at "Mar sin leibh a athair"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eilidh19845

A bit like French in that the sound of two vowels together is disliked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

So you always drop the a before a vowel in Gaelic (but not in written Irish).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CIMacAonghais

Gaelic vowels hate each other and don't like to sit next to each other in separate words. Have a look at the grammar notes, they will explain in more detail. https://www.duome.eu/tips/en/gd

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