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  5. "Oidhche mhath!"

"Oidhche mhath!"

Translation:Good night!

December 9, 2019

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/goreillaz

Why is 'math' spelled as 'mtath' here? Can someone explain the grammar? Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tj4234

There are numerous posts on this on the discussion thread which go into detail. You can also read about it in the lesson info. It's basically because oidhche is a feminine noun. All feminine nouns cause lenition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/goreillaz

Thank you so much!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silmeth

Because oidhche is a feminine noun and adjectives attributing feminine nouns in nominative-accusative get lenited.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/goreillaz

Thanks for your reply - have some lingots (:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlanS181824

I absolutely love that Gàidhlig maintains the Old Irish spelling of 'oidhche' as opposed to the modern Gaeilge spelling, 'oíche'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silmeth

Technically, Classical Gaelic (or Early Modern Irish) spelling. ;-) In Old Irish it’d be aidche (in genitive) or adaig in nominative (or oidche in later OIr).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

Yes, modern Gaelic spelling is so close to Classical Irish that Dwelly is often the easiest dictionary to find Classical Irish words in.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/E-Gaelic_Garlic-

I think "Oidhche" is my favorite gaelic word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

It's an interesting word because it is unusual in that no-one knows where it comes from. It is only found in Gaelic, Irish and Manx. Most European languages (including Welsh) use a word beginning with n, so where this apparently unrelated word comes from is baffling.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silmeth

But also note that the inherited common Indo-European term is petrified in some phrases like a-nochd tonight (this -nochd thingy being direct cognate of En. night, Lat. nox, Pol. noc, etc.).

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