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  5. "Tea! Thank you, sister!"

"Tea! Thank you, sister!"

Translation:Tì! Tapadh leat a phiuthar!

December 10, 2019

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmandaFlee1

Is it a phiuthar or a phiuthair? I've been doing a practice session and sometimes, it has one version and sometimes the other and now I'm totally confused, because I thought the vocative added both an 'h' and an 'i' Balach to bhalaich etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

This was an error which should now have been corrected. It is a phiuthar. You only add the i to masculine words. Some words such as màthair already have the i, so a phiuthar is unique, so far as I can determine, in being a vocative ending in -ar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vanessa260219

What is the difference between leat and leibh when saying thank you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tj4234

As is mentioned in the course notes, one is informal and the other is formal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ian116730

Where does one find the course notes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yxnGJDdi

I've found that the course notes for this language can only be accessed via the website version of duolingo. Don't know why they don't show on the phone apps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CIMacAonghais

Hi, all volunteer created courses are like this. Only staff created courses have them in the app.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

Also leibh is plural so used when thanking multiple people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vanessa260219

I've been told that apparently the course notes can be found here: https://www.duome.eu/tips/en/gd Not sure how to access them in the app though. If someone knows how please elaborate :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coiseam

Is 'taing' not okay for 'thank you'? or would you only say 'moran taing' to express thanks?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

taing only gets used with moran as an expression of gratitude because it's the 'noun' thanks. It might be talked about elsewhere, but if you are thanking someone use tapadh leat/leibh or moran taing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vanessa260219

I've been told that apparently the course notes can be found here: https://www.duome.eu/tips/en/gd Not sure how to access them in the app though. If someone knows how please elaborate :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CIMacAonghais

Hi, course notes cannot be accessed in the app unfortunately. Only staff built courses on Duo have them on the app.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryBallan

How does one know when to use "a" after e.g."Thank you." Is it not used when the next word begins with a vowel?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

A is the vocative particle. Whenever you are talking to someone starting with a consonant, you add a in front. It's a bit like saying oh friend in English. This a causes lenition (i.e. adding an h after the majority of consonants). It is not used this side of the Irish Sea in front of a vowel (or fh + vowel).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryBallan

Thanks for your clear explanation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coiseam

The 'a' here is the vocative particle. it tells us that the speaker is addressing their sister. The vocative case causes lenition, hence "piuthar" > "phiuthar".

...

This is one of the tricky ones we just have to get used to reading the context of. On it's own "a phiuthar" could be someone addressing their own sister, or it could be someone talking about their (male) friend's sister. "Taing, a phiuthar" is me thanking my sister, "thuirt mi sin ri a phiuthar" is me telling someone that "i told his sister that".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

I am afraid I do not quite agree with you, either pedagogically or grammatically. Firstly, people do not usually get confused whether a vocative is being used, as it is usually obvious from the context, so I think mentioning the word for 'his' just introduces a complication where there is none.

But grammatically, this words is pretty tricky, with an irregular genitive, which may confuse about the dative - but in fact it is ri a phiuthair - i.e. the dative is formed regularly from the nominative, notwithstanding the genitive. This word is also pretty counter-intuitive, as it will probably be the only word you ever meet that is feminine and ends in -ar. Of course some - or all - of this may be something you haven't covered yet, as they have a deliberate policy of introducing things, such as the preposition here, with simple examples that happen not to require anything odd, before going onto more tricky examples later.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emmac9

How do you pronounce phiuthar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

Very much like English fewer.

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