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  5. "I am seeing my husband."

"I am seeing my husband."

Translation:Tha mi a' faicinn an duine agam.

December 11, 2019

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fiona_Emm

Puzzled why this is 'an duine' not simply 'duine'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicdhaibhidh

Has to include "the" unless the female in question is a bigamist. :) - an duine agam = the husband at/by me = my husband; duine agam = a husband at/by me implies "one of my husbands"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

I can understand why they are doing it this way so as not to confuse the beginners but a little frustrated by mo dhuine not being accepted since family fits under those possessives usually.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fiona_Emm

I remember in class this being introduced as an anomoly. It is mo bhean, but an duine agam. If there was a cultural explanation, I don't recall it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

I have not heard about the gender difference. I was taught that you should not use mo unless the relationship is determined by the rules of science, e.g. someone who shares your DNA. Husband and wife are only societal constructs so you should use agam. This rule is not always followed, and when rules break down they often do so unevenly, so that could explain the gender difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

Possibly because bean is actually wife (well mostly, when used as a noun rather than prefix), whereas duine is technically a man, so the man at me = husband. But it's been a while since I revised family stuff.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fiona_Emm

Thanks - that explains it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicdhaibhidh

'S e ur beatha :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/betsy944139

The convention of "mo bean" and "an duine" sounds to me like a throw-back to an earlier time when women were chattel. Upon marriage, women were the property of THE man, so referred to as MY wife, and reciprocally, a husband was THE man that HIS good wife must heed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

Well, I am not convinced it is even historically correct. I would like to see some evidence. And it doesn't even make sense with the accepted uses of the two types of possessive, however sexist you are. I suspect it may have crept in by simple confusion when people started learning English, and losing understanding of the difference.

As for what you say about chattel, this applied much less in the Gaelic world. Women did not change their name to indicate they were somebody else's. They kept their own name - and that wasn't even mac X as that means 'son of X'. It was nic X which is treated as if it means 'daughter of X' (although it actually means 'daughter of son of X'). And this is still how it works with people who use fully Gaelic names.

Then whatever the reason, languages have to adapt. Both English and Gaelic have adapted to modern attitudes. There is no way on earth I would teach this sexist grammar in school - as it would not be allowed.

And also note it is mo bhean, as mo causes lenition. So if you choose to say mo dhuine that would be lenited too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerrickMcClure1

Surely it should be NA DHUINE agam - genitive after the verbal noun?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

'an duine' remains the same in the genitive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coiseam

it's not in the genetive here though?
'an duine Mairi' uses the genetive (mary's husband), but the husband at mary (the husband mary has) uses the dative case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

Correct, but the answer above is misleading. Duine is in the nominative/accusative (not sure what they call that on this course) in either situation. It is Mairi that would be in the genitive, or 'me' (hidden in agam) that is in the dative. So no effect on an duine, even if it did change in the genitive or dative.

And na does not cause lenition anyway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coiseam

Should it not also accept 'fear' instead of duine?
(i have only ever come across fear used for one's man, rather than duine)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

Traditionally, duine was similar to fear but I think it was usually duine for a husband. As duine is increasingly being used when you need a gender-neutral term (rather like guy in English), perhaps it will drop out of use for a husband. The term cèile is often used for a husband but is in fact gender neutral, so that will probably become the standard gender-neutral word for a spouse. The only word I have ever heard for 'partner' is partner although there are Gaelic forms in the dictionary.

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