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  5. "A bheil suiteas agad?"

"A bheil suiteas agad?"

Translation:Do you have a candy?

December 12, 2019

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferGo299300

This is Scotland...we do not use the word candy. We use sweets, sweeties or sweet. The word candy isUS-speak.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

Duolingo is an international website. Sweets, sweeties, and sweet are all accepted though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Markatansky

Aye, but candy is no an internaitional word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

All Duolingo's courses use American English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FlawyerLawyer

Except the Welsh course. :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yulex

This isn't Scotland, it's the internet. Besides, Scottish Gaelic is also spoken in Nova Scotia, and there's no reason Americans can't learn Scottish Gaelic too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidCarver

Jennifer, don't you remember the song about Coulter's Candy popularised by Jimmie McGregor and Robin Hall?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sandra908885

That candy was a particular kind of hard sweet, if I recall rightly. And when you hear it spoken, suiteas is so obviously taken from "sweeties", like many words imported into Gaelic from English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Segwyne

I would like to suggest that Do you have candy? is a better default than Do you have a candy? Candy is usually (though not always) considered a mass noun un the US.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

Both would work, imo. I agree on the whole, though, and it accepts either I believe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patrick_Irish

Candy is very much a North American term.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FionaNicCoinnich

Doesn't accept lolly or lollies. We don't really use sweets or candy in Australia


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sandra908885

Lollies are a very particular type of sweet (candy) in Scotland. Not popular with grown-ups....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FlawyerLawyer

But in Australia and in New Zealand "lolly/lollies" are any "candy/sweets". So it should also be accepted. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Batbutch1

Are all kinds of candies/sweets called lollies in Australia? It makes me think only of lollipops...(hard candy on a stick.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FlawyerLawyer

Yes. Lolly equals candy or sweets (US and UK)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yulex

Why is the slender 't' here not pronounced like an English 'ch' like usual?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

Some speakers may, but basically because it is a loanword.

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