"Você acha os pássaros?"

Translation:Do you find the birds?

4/26/2013, 7:03:18 PM

61 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/cjtayl89

"Do you find the birds" just sounds weird. I would never say that. Shouldn't it be 'Did you find/Have you found the birds?"

7/18/2013, 9:23:30 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/kauev
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It sounds damn weird but it's not wrong.

The exact sentence may not sound as clear, but changing a little of it we could get it straight: "Você acha quantos pássaros em um dia?" - "How many birds do you find in one day?" or "Você acha pássaros à noite?" - "Do you find birds at night?"

8/13/2013, 5:49:36 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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"Voce acha" isn't the present perfect verb tense in Portuguese. "Voce tem achado os passeros" would be the present perfect although it isn't used the same way in Portuguese as it is in English.

2/7/2014, 5:10:47 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/kauev
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You are right, I just fixed it.

2/15/2014, 6:07:23 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/philipparker
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So achar can mean to think or to find?

6/5/2013, 2:35:10 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/migekun
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In English we also use both synonymously; e.g. "do you find that..." as in "do you think that..."

2/12/2014, 3:16:14 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/philipparker
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This sentence is just a bad one though. "Do you find the birds?" That leaves the listener anticipating more followup to that question.

2/13/2014, 3:56:11 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/peterjoel58

Not quite: do you find is more about reaching a conclusion and do you think is more about holding an opinion or being aware.

1/7/2017, 3:15:10 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/JCMcGee
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"Do you find the birds" is just not proper spoken English.

9/23/2013, 1:38:32 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/djeidot
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The Portuguese sentence is equally weird...

10/23/2013, 2:54:34 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DREDWARD

IT'S just a learning experience,we're not here to learn English! :)

11/5/2015, 7:58:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/tinbob
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But it would certainly make learning portuguese easier if we were able to understand what the sentence was supposed to mean, and if the translation doesn't make sense, it's not a very useful learning experience since you just dismiss it as an error. The use of tenses doesn't necessarily match language per language, so that in some context, language A may use the present tense where language B would use the past tense, but if that's the case here, is just not clear enough for me to take anything away from this 'learning experience'.

11/23/2016, 3:14:40 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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How about "Are you finding the birds?

12/16/2013, 6:34:35 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/djeidot
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I think this is acceptable. The direct translation of "Are you finding the birds?" is "Você está achando os pássaros?" but this is a weird sentence as well.

12/17/2013, 11:09:07 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/GreengoStarr

No, it's not acceptable unless you are from India. We do not use the verb find in the continuous tense In English.

10/19/2014, 2:49:46 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/inshadeone

This is untrue. You can use the verb to find in present continuous just fine in English. Most often it would be in the context of opinion, i.e. "How are you finding the city to be so far?" - asking a visitor or freshly relocated person who has already spent some time in the place but is still in the process of discovering it. "I am finding loose change on the ground everywhere I go" is an example of repeated action that extends to the past as well as it is expected to extend into the future (in other words, an established pettern). In other words, it is absolutely acceptable to use present continuous for the verb 'to find' in English.

2/10/2015, 8:11:59 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/todji

I concur.

2/10/2015, 10:06:50 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/GregIhnen

To quote Benny Hill: Q: How do you find the pygmy women in the tall grass? A: Pretty damn good.

8/8/2015, 1:44:26 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/subkid

I'm afraid to say I think this one is just broken, and I can't see how it could easily be fixed. The English translation is pure nonsense, and from what people on here are saying the Portuguese is at best a bit weird and at worst kinda nonsensical too. I'm all for learning how to cope with unique and idiomatic aspects of languages, or phrases and constructions which don't easily translate into other languages, but that doesn't seem to be what's going on here. If there are longer sentences based around this one which genuinely do make sense, then by all means feed them in later in the course; but as it is I don't really see how teaching myself some arbitrary translation of an awkward/clumsy Portuguese phrase into a meaningless English one is going to help me with learning Portuguese.

2/4/2016, 12:46:24 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/garysferrao

I'm all for learning how to cope with unique and idiomatic aspects of languages, or phrases and constructions which don't easily translate into other languages, but that doesn't seem to be what's going on here.

I agree. At best, a literal translation helps to get the formation of words 'natively' in the brain. Although grammar wise "do you find the birds" is not wrong, this sentence doesn't make sense to me.

Someone else might disagree with what i just said. It's alright.

Anyone here knows how to tell Duo to stop showing me certain sentences? This's what i want. I get it wrong, and then it prompts this to me later again and again. And the train of thought i use while translating other sentences just breaks here (and some other places).

2/11/2016, 6:42:02 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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The moderators can't change grammatically incorrect / nonsensical sentences in the target language. They can only modify incorrect translations.

2/11/2016, 3:14:44 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/kalukuhan
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Somehow it sounds like "passems."

8/13/2013, 2:11:55 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/RedBishop

My question is is the Portuguese version correct? Does it make any sense at all to you native speakers? For the English version, do you find only works in context. Ex. Do you find the birds interesting, etc...

7/28/2014, 10:38:37 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/sohippie

I think in both languages it is a weird sentence that would probably rarely be used and only makes sense in very specific contexts. I imagine duolingo includes it to practice the grammar, not because it is an especially practical sentence.

8/8/2014, 11:57:07 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DREDWARD

THANK YOU FOR FINALLY EXPRESSING AN INTELLIGENT RESPONSE! SOMETIMES THE MORE ABSURD,THE MORE YOU LEARN!!! :) OBRIGADO SOHIPPIE.....

4/3/2015, 9:12:04 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/mlitsonata

The problem with "Do you find the birds?" is that "do" is present tense. If it was present, and you were there at the time he was finding them, you would not need to ask the question. It doesn't make sense. We always say "Did you find the birds?" or "Can you find the birds?" You can't ask if someone found something in the present tense. It's illogical. No?

12/11/2014, 6:39:59 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/GreengoStarr

The use of the present in Portuguese is, more or less, the equivalent of a mixture of present simple and present continuous in English. However, we can't use find in the present continuous tense in English unless we are from India! Are you finding the birds? Just picture your head wobbling from side to side as you say this.

12/12/2014, 12:56:26 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/inshadeone

This is untrue. You can use the verb to find in present continuous just fine in English. Most often it would be in the context of opinion, i.e. "How are you finding the city to be so far?" - asking a visitor or freshly relocated person who has already spent some time in the place but is still in the process of discovering it. "I am finding loose change on the ground everywhere I go" is an example of repeated action that extends to the past as well as it is expected to extend into the future (in other words, an established pettern). In other words, it is absolutely acceptable to use present continuous for the verb 'to find' in English.

2/10/2015, 8:11:31 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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Using find progressively changes the meaning.

I am finding the city difficult to navigate. = I am experiencing problems in getting around the city.

We don't say: "I am finding the web site on the computer." Find is a non-progressive achievement verb.

First we look for something - which can take time - and then we find it". You either find it or you don't find it. It is a momentary action, not a progressive action.

To use "find" as in "finding coins on the ground over a period of time", you can say; "I keep finding coins...." (that's a short-lived series of repetitive actions.)

11/6/2015, 4:05:23 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Scutigera

I find coins on the ground, all the time...

I find birds in the trees too. So when I go/look out, I find birds. What do I see when I look in trees? I find birds. I also find leaves, and limbs, and branches, and bark. Sometimes I find spiders, or beetles.

I am finding the spider website right now.

Do you find the birds, in the bushes too?

Do you find easter eggs, on Easter morning?

Do you find coins, in your pocket?

Do you find stores, at the mall?

When you go to the mall, what do you find? I find stores.

We need to learn how basic Portuguese works before we can learn more complex Portuguese and I guess that means learning English better as well (which all in all the focus on specific sentences and words can make it seem absurd even when we actually use these types of phrases all the time when we are not thinking about them and dissecting them).

2/27/2017, 1:43:49 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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Right. I find coins on the ground all the time. // Do you find stores at the mall? As you have demonstrated, the present simple is used for general statement of facts.

My post was in response to two preceding posts about the use of the "present continuous" tense with a non-progressive verb like "find", not the simple present.

It actually isn't surprising to find discussions about grammar, syntax, semantics on a site dedicated to language learning. That is part of learning a language without the advantage of immersion - trying to understand the meaning behind the words on the page.

2/27/2017, 3:11:33 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/garysferrao

"you find the birds?" is marked wrong. Unfortunately, literal translation used to work in lower levels. Wonder why they decided only "DO you find the birds?" (i 'missed' a word) in higher levels.

BTW, in India, "you find the birds?" (with intonation) is perfectly valid English. "do" is implied.

2/11/2016, 4:00:41 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/GreengoStarr

What happened to your previous identical post from a week or two ago? In informal, spoken English you can drop the auxiliary do in most countries if you maintain the rising inflection at the end.

2/11/2016, 5:12:13 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/garysferrao

«my behaviour?» …just like Duo keeps asking me the same question in spite of me typing the 'correct' sentence (flash-card logic gone wrong). It seems like i can't teach Duo with repeated input (only Duo can teach), or the report button isn't working.

BTW, i'm pleasantly surprised there are people who read and remember comments. :-) I'm quite happy with Duo; it's just this sentence. And other commenters seem to find some problem with it too.

2/11/2016, 6:27:51 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/RichJHale

The reason the sentences sound weird is that they are trying to build in words that you have already learnt in previous lessons. You'll notice that we've already learnt animals, so it helps to use "bird" again in the context of the current lesson. Also as others mention, direct translation to English does not always work and is not supposed to. If you can't grasp that concept then you're not at a stage where you're recognising the distinct grammar of the language.

2/6/2017, 1:38:35 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/peterjoel58

I don't think that anyone is questioning the intent of the phrase, but it is still fair to criticize the content.

2/6/2017, 5:28:22 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/amckel
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Can you see the birds is a lot more natural sounding in English, at least in British English. It should be accepted

5/31/2013, 10:21:08 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Find implies that they may not be obviously seen. They could be somewhat hidden in a tree. It could be that the birds escaped from the cage and out the window. You may have to go out and look from place to place, while see implies just your eyes looking.

12/16/2013, 6:26:22 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/aviso
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Is the translation 'do you find the birds' correct? Isnt 'Did you find the birds' more appropriate?

6/23/2013, 6:27:18 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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What if I find one but I am still looking for the others? Then it would still be going on and not in the past.

12/16/2013, 6:32:24 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/kauev
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The correct translation for "Did you find the birds?" is "Você achou (encontrou) os pássaros?".

8/13/2013, 6:38:30 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/RomaRRio

Maybe "Do you search the birds" is more correct?

8/12/2013, 8:06:58 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/kauev
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'To search' in portuguese is 'procurar'. 'Achar', in the presented context means 'to find', and it's a synonym for 'encontrar', though it can mean "to think" - synonym for 'pensar' - in some cases (only when you intend to express the idea of "i understand that...", "i believe that...", "I think that...").

There's even a saying that could help you to remember it: "quem procura, acha" - "who searches, finds".

8/13/2013, 5:35:25 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/gabriellespeaks

Why is there no "ç" in this você?

5/14/2014, 5:00:52 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew48

C automatically makes an S sound in Portuguese (as in English) before the letters E and I.

3/5/2015, 4:39:14 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/garysferrao

Normally, "c" makes a hard sound /k/ (क), as in cat, cot, cut. But in the later Latin period, "c" before "e" or "i" was automatically softened to /ch/ (च), which later went to /s/ (स).

But "c" before "a", "o", "u" remained hard. To make it soft, you use that accent, as in façade, maçã, etc.

2/7/2016, 9:48:31 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/boxxybrownn

"you found the birds?" doesnt work, yet the broken english of "Do you find the birds?" is the answer.

6/19/2014, 7:35:25 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/vinidcali
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The PT sentence is in the present tense. It can't just be translated to past tense. It makes no sense in PT either C:

1/9/2016, 3:01:39 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/matthew-j-miller

My girlfriend's from Brazil, and she says this sounds weird

8/19/2014, 8:45:26 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielTietz

This sounds strange but it's not wrong

9/17/2014, 8:46:33 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/todji

shouldn't this sentence be "voce acha QUE os passoros"?

11/29/2014, 1:02:56 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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Você acha que os pássaros...? = Do you think that the birds.....?

1/14/2016, 8:07:59 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MariaSilfverberg

the intonation does not tell us it is a question. Bad !

2/22/2015, 12:57:20 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/sashalen

brasilian portuguese does not go up at the end the way english does for a question.

2/22/2015, 4:30:34 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MariaSilfverberg

Ok.But do they in Portugal? And how do you know then it is a question and not a statement. (I am learnign EP ).

2/22/2015, 6:11:55 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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The intonation rises only on (1) questions that have "yes or no" answers or (2) on "echo" questions which are used to express surprise or confirm information. The intonation drops on "wh-information" questions.

Check out Rachel's English on youtube - she teaches intonation.

11/6/2015, 3:57:04 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Otaku2Learn
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This sounds so weird. I thought it would be a grammatical error. So is it actually "do" instead of "did"?

9/16/2017, 6:21:05 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
Mod
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Did you find...? = você achou...?

9/16/2017, 6:41:52 PM
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