https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lyssas274potatoe

German is Hard!

Do you agree? I just started German and i cant get it right!!

July 2, 2014

124 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AquaV1tae

The hardest part for me (Don't laugh) is the "Das" "Der" "Den" "Die" ..... it took me forever to realize that they aren't completely random.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ACatterpillar

That is why I like Latin. It has absolutely NO articles. Sure, it has three genders (which apply to adjectives as well as nouns), but it does not care if it is a boy or the boy or der Junge or eine Jungen. As long as you know boy/boys, you are good.

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saschambaer

Except ultimately in Latin you need to memorize way more. In German, you need to memorize three forms of a noun (singular nominative, singular genitive and plural nominative) and its gender. If you know a noun is masculine, singular and in the dative case, you know its definite article is dem and its indefinite is einem. In Latin, you need to learn all the different declensions and then it's not even regular either.

And I'm not even going to start on the verbs.

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ijoni

There are rules in latin. German goes berzerk...

July 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lyssas274potatoe

ha ha ha!!!

July 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinIR

They are a bit... except for den, which you can always tell

July 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lyssas274potatoe

hey my brother has the same screensaver as your portfolio

July 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinIR

Well... that's nice

July 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimothyGeek

You made my day. :D

July 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Comradesev

I find German to be easier than Spanish, because I can see more common roots in German than in Spanish.

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanLeee

German may start off easy, but there are a host of reasons why it is more complicated than Spanish. In fact, Spanish is arguably one of the easiest languages for an English speaker to learn.

There are the obvious reasons it's difficult: 3 Genders, adj/noun declensions, syntax, prepositions, etc..

Then there are the less obvious reasons it's difficult: The idiomatic nature of the language, and the subtle distinctions made in words that seem so pointless when looked at from English.

For example: In English we have a perfectly fine verb: 'to like'

I like Berlin, I like my parents, I like apples, I like to play games, even if you're ordering food you can say I'd like something, etc... You can go on liking not having to worry about how you're liking, because the liking is liking no matter how you'd like!

Now take a look at this concept of liking in German: (mögen)

You like to play tennis? Not in German. In German: YOU PLAY TENNIS GLADLY.

You liked Berlin? Not in German. In German: BERLIN PLEASED YOU.

Would you like something? Close, but in German: You would like/have GLADLY something.

You like apples? Okay, now you can mögen the apples.

These subtle differences extend to overlapping uses. For example:

You can only really mögen a person you know. Otherwise, you need to be saying that that person gefällt you. Now take an object, the difference here switches from a focus of you liking (with mögen) to the object appealing to you (gefällt).

Yet for "Ich mag das Auto" (and) "Das Auto gefällt mir", we'd translate both as "I like the car." The use of the two verbs is changing the focus of the sentence in a subtle way (from the user to the object), yet not the same way as simply reversing the word order in: "Das Auto mag ich."

I've gone at length here to illustrate this, but I notice these sorts of things all the time with German verbs. So I agree that German is easy in some places, but like spelling in English, when German wants to be complicated it knocks the ball out of the park. (and I hate baseball) :)

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ijoni

Dude...You deserve lingots.

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanLeee

Haha thanks

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ellenthealmond

Here, take a lingot just because

July 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nathansk8s

you just took a knowledge dump on all of us xD this explanation is sick.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mattaes

Well this is just one aspect of German that has more to it than English. I think you're just cherry picking. And you cannot just look at a language from a grammar perspective, I like to look at it from a human perspective. What is actually used in everyday conversation. When you look at German like this, then it is very easy! There are many aspects of it's grammar that are a walk in the park. When you talk to people in REAL LIFE, this is how it looks in German.

I go now = Ich gehe jetzt

I am going now = Ich gehe jetzt

I'm going now = Ich gehe jetzt

I will go now = Ich gehe jetzt

I'll go now = Ich gehe jetzt

I'll be going now = Ich gehe jetzt

I'll be off now = Ich gehe jetzt

I am going to go now = Ich gehe jetzt

See what I mean?

I will say that your example is biased because German has the easiest verb conjugation and tenses of all courses offered. In conversation, German uses just 2 of these tenses for the majority of the time (present and present perfect) with a hint of passive and subjunctive. The simple past you can almost forget entirely. It uses at most 20 of them! Where as Spanish has one of the toughest verb conjugations if not the toughest of the 5. There is hardly any slang in German, I have never had to learn any of it by heart (living in Germany for 2 years) where as the amount of slang in Spanish is very extensive, giving English a run for it's money.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanLeee

You almost have to cherry pick to fully explain these seemingly minute distinctions that can be hard for English speakers to grasp. :) These small distinctions occur all the time with verbs, another example would be 'merken' and 'bemerken' to mean 'to notice' or 'rennen' and 'laufen' to mean 'to run'.

Going back to what you were saying though, yes every language's prescriptive (written) rules will be more complicated than it's descriptive (spoken) rules. Spanish is no exception to that! So to weigh these descriptive habits of German against the prescriptive habits of Spanish is more than unfair. :( In other words, you're saying the way German is really spoken is easier than all of these hard grammatical tenses of Spanish. I'm sure the way Spanish is spoken, is much easier than all of the grammar German has to offer. The language was even reformed in the 90's (I think) because it was so needlessly complex.

I think to someone who is not familiar with English or German, your examples could make English look more complicated. You've given a very simple sentence in German, that takes advantage of the continuous form in English, and the use of an even simpler contraction system, as well as the fact that the future tense in spoken German is rarely used. However (he stresses loudly), this is what I was saying by German starting off simple. It really is simple in this regard, I agree! Expand your example in any direction, and it becomes needlessly complicated.

Want to say you're going to somewhere? Now you're deciding between, zu, nach, in, auf just for one preposition in English! Is it someplace far away that you're most likely not walking to? Now you're not even using gehen, but fahren.

An English speaker's gut reaction is to say: Ich gehe zu Deutschland. Only then does he find out that when you travel to a broad or large destination like a country, zu is not used, but instead nach. It doesn't stop there because I live in America, so I would never gehen my way over to Deutschland, I'd need to fahren.

So: Ich gehe zu Deutschland (becomes) Ich fahre nach Deutschland.

Okay, but surely I can gehen my way zu my house right? Nope

Okay, I can gehen my way zu the movies right? Nope

To the bank? Nope

To the.. nope. Just kidding, yea you can gehen zu the store, that's cool.

It's this sort of unrelenting relentlessness that German possesses with the minute distinctions it wants to make.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kunstkritik

You can say "Ich gehe nach Amerika" but it has more a final statement kind of thing like you are moving there, not traveling. Also:

Ich gehe zur Bank, to the bank

Ich gehe zum Kino, to the movies

Ich gehe zu meinem Haus, to my house (yeah unfair, nobody speaks like that in the sense of going home but wayne).

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanLeee

I'm just ranting uncontrollably at this point. Haha. That's what I mean though, the implications you're speaking of.

I probably sound like I hate German, I really don't, I like it a lot and enjoy learning it!

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jobabel

kunstkr1tik is right, all those exist but there a some subtle differences in meaning:

"Ich gehe ins Kino" means that you are going to watch a movie in the cinema whereas "Ich gehe zum Kino" means that you are going to the building without necessarily entering it. Usage example: "Geh schon mal zum Kino und warte dort auf mich."

Same for home/house. If you go home, you'd say "Ich gehe nach Hause". If you enter the building, then it's "Ich gehe ins Haus." Finally, if you are just going to the building it is "zum Haus", example: "Der Hund ist bestimmt zurück zum Haus gelaufen."

July 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saschambaer

There is hardly any slang in German

Yeah, no, I disagree on that.

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mattaes

I live in Germany and have spoken to many about this from different backgrounds and as a whole there is hardly any. Let me specify. Less than 100 things, perhaps less with English having in the 1000's. A lot of their 'idioms' are more logical than English.

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Comradesev

I've found this out long ago, but I still find it easier than any other language I have yet tried.

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanLeee

Maybe you were born to speak German ha! Out of all the languages available for English speakers on Duolingo right now, I'd say German's the hardest. That's just me though.

I guess what I was trying to say until I started ranting was that as far as Spanish is concerned, it's much easier than German.

I mean just take plurals for example. You can't really give someone a quick definition of how to make a noun plural in German.

In Spanish you add an 's', sometimes changing the vowel sound made of the word.

Someone would sooner murder me than listen to me explain the 4 cases of German, and the fact that that influences adjective declensions as well as definite/indefinite articles would be proper grounds for the act.

In Spanish, just like in English, case only shows up in pronouns!

There are a lot of reasons why Spanish is easier in my opinion, I guess we'll have to agree to disagree haha! Either way, I still think German is an interesting and fun language!

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheGandalf

Yeah I'd say that although on the surface German looks closer to English, when you dig deeper Spanish is probably more similar in a sense.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

I agree with that.

I'm a native Brazilian, and I speak Portuguese, which is almost the same as Spanish.

Duolingo only offers German from English, so I can really notice many sentences that just don't make any sense to an English speaker, but they are just the same in Portuguese.

Sometimes I'd say that German is a "twisted-words Portuguese", because of its resemblance.

Now, I don't know which is harder, German or Portuguese (because being native just doesn't let you analyse that well).

But I believe German is harder:

  • More genders: 3 x 2
  • Cases changing declensions everywhere
  • Declensions changing in adjectives depending on which article is used.
  • Weird words that just mean nothing but change the sentence anyway (doch, ja, je, mal) (Portuguese has some too, and once I get used to the German ones, maybe I can associate them and say once again that German is a twisted-words Portuguese)
  • Tons of phrasal verbs!!! (I mean, verbs with dettachable prepositions that change meanings completely)

What is alike between both???

  • Reflexive verbs - Portuguese and German has those, and they match in a great rate. English has abandoned reflexive verbs almost completely
  • Direct x Indirect objects - There is also more matches between objects behaviors between Portuguese and German than between German and English
  • Many expressions and keywords that act the same way but cannot be used like that in English (Ex: noch x ainda)

German is very easy to start from English. But to go deep and really "talk" it, that's another story.

Well....Bis bald! Até logo! Hasta luego! Until soon (oops)

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kunstkritik

as a german native speaker I have to say that I noticed the same things as danmoller but just with portuguese lol.

But at least it is pretty easy for germans to learn english, because it is super broken down easy german ;)

Just the spelling / pronounciation of english is a mess

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ACatterpillar

Be glad the Germans stuck to four. Latin has five cases, five noun declensions, and five (technically four) verb conjugations. It also has two classes of adjectives.

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Chalala-

I find Spanish easier. Maybe it is because we use some Spanish words like kalye (calle), panadero, abogado, etc. here in the Philippines. :D

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ACatterpillar

I found that very amusing. You deserve a lingot, but I am stingy. You will have to settle for an up vote.

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Auragenerator

It really helps to know a second language when learning a new one. The similarities I don't find in English when learning German I sometimes find in Russian. But of course there is that articles thing...

July 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bar_an

That exactly what I tought before I started to learn German. "German is exactly like English with a scarier 'ch'. It will be very easy to learn that language".... I was wrong... totaly wrong. =/

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Comradesev

Bär-bear, Katze-cat, hallo-hello, gut-good, mir-me, lieb-love, haben-have, wir-we, Sonne-sun, Mond-moon, Wasser-water, Eis-ice, Schwert-sword, Maus-mouse, Mann-man. You weren't totally wrong. I am no beginner to German and I understand German grammar is more complicated than in English, but a lot of it's vocabulary shares common roots to English vocabulary.

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ijoni

Eis also means ice cream in german.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saschambaer

Unless you're in Switzerland, we call that stuff Glacé (French for 'frozen', but we stress it on the wrong syllable [GLAS-se instead of gla-SE])

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bar_an

Of course it isn't the hardest language to learn. But it still not that easy either.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tkaschel

Ahhh, don't tell me that; I just started my German courses!

January 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kgm_7

You find German easier than Spanish? :D That's amazing! I think it's the hardest on here :D. If I would list them from hardest to easiest in terms of grammar, it would be German, Italian, French, Portuguese then Spanish :)

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SharyOrta-

I would disagree but that's only because my Dad likes to speak Spanish to me and I had to take classes, of course I forgot most of it but it's pretty easy to me. German is definitely close to English.

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lyssas274potatoe

what is your native language?

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Comradesev

English.

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gekreuzigt

I'm Spanish native speaker (lucky for me) and I find a great relation between German and English. Spanish is really hard, so many rules and exceptions..

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheGandalf

Spanish hasn't seemed hard to me yet (but I haven't gotten to the supposedly difficult complex verb tenses), and I honestly think English is a lot less logical than Spanish for the most part, due to its many exceptions. I once heard that the only rule with no exceptions in the English language is "There are exceptions to all other rules".

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krizia.roh

mi papá tiene 50 años my dad is 50 years old

mi papa tiene 50 anos my potato has 50 buttholes

yeah Spanish is easy (old joke never gets old)

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IchbinAmerikaner

I find Spanish a lot easier, but maybe that's because I grew up hearing a few Spanish words.

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dallontrash

I actually find German pretty easy. The only difficulty I really have with it is remembering the cases and the genders of each word. My native language is English, so that plays a role in how difficult I find it, I think, considering Modern English derives from Old English, which is almost exactly like German. I wish you luck in your adventure learning German and I'm happy to answer any questions you might have to the best of my ability!

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AquaV1tae

I love how people are always like "English is Germanic" and assume that that makes it easier... it doesn't, XD. I think language difficulties have to do with something I call "Aptness." For instance, I find French super easy. However, my friend who's also a native English speaker, finds French difficult. I think it just depends on what languages you're apt in.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dallontrash

Well, I think it just depends on the person. I find German a lot easier BECAUSE it's so closely related to English and English is a Germanic language. I find French and Italian very difficult pronunciation wise, but German is easy for me. Sure, I slip up sometimes, but it's mostly when I haven't practiced pronunciation very much. I don't struggle with German so much and I haven't really from day one because I personally find it easy. Therefore, I believe that language difficulty depends on the person. Others find Romantic languages easy while I find the Germanic languages easy.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ali_RL

I only find the vocab to be similar to English... The grammar/structure is so different. I find that Spanish grammar is waaaaay easier.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dallontrash

Oh yes, grammar wise, German is difficult to learn compared to English, but once you get it down, it's pretty easy.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ali_RL

At an advanced level, German is much harder to learn and especially speak in comparison to French, Spanish, Italian etc... I know myself that this is true for Spanish and I have also spoken to teachers about it. German on duolingo is easy, but how many times will you say 'My finger is in the soup' whilst in a German speaking country?

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EeroK

Just a point: DL isn't about teaching phrases or useful sentences. It teaches grammar, structure and vocabulary, so that you can form those sentences ;)

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ali_RL

I don't think it teaches the grammar so much, but I do agree that it isn't for phrases etc... I also don't think i'd be able to form correct sentences for everyday conversations based on Duo alone, there are too many rules and exceptions to these rules to cover them all. I'm not complaining, I love it and it's free! \o/

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanLeee

Well it teaches grammar, but "subconsciously." Of course no one going through Duolingo is going to know what declining an adjective means for example, but it's designed so that people pick up on those patterns and learn them without ever really realizing what they're doing. So you could make the argument both ways about it teaching Grammar I'm sure.

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/killary45

I would say that Duo is brilliant at giving us practice in grammar - but does not teach it. I think that anyone who can pick up on the German patterns subconsciously just from the Duo tree must be a genius, I know that I could not.

I guess that virtually all of us going down the German tree have to keep on looking for places where the patterns are explained. I really, really wish that they gave us some simple explanations of what is happening to the forms as they change and why; and that the exercises were selected in groups with similar changes and patterns together. Just giving us a page of tables of declensions and conjugations does not really do it for me.

Duo is still the best software around though, and its FREE!.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zippzopp

I think any language is going to be a challenge, or learning anything for that matter. Try to memorize a poem in native language, not going to be easy, not easy to learn to type, etc. But when you see how much is so similiar I feel it makes it easier than any other language at least from an english as native. Try to think of the similiar words and more will start to click in or at least give hope of getting it. Example-that is good-Das ist Gut, even sound the same with a little accent on the english side, coffee=kaffee, dog=hund-as in hound dog is how to remember that, thisrt=durst, water=wasser. Think of how much is very easy to learn and remember and the rest will be easier, not easy but easier. " Dieses Bett ist kalt." say it with a little german accent=this bed is cold, or "das ist mein stuhl"=that is my chair, I remembered stuhl as in stool which is kinda a chair, ha ha

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kunstkritik

Even many native speakers do stupid mistakes while they speak german.

Literally translated mistakes:

  • I am as better as you

  • Give it to I

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Intifadanow

I find German even easier than my native language (Hebrew)

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IchbinAmerikaner

I can see why you'd find it easier than Hebrew.

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pierre980

When I started learning German, it seemed to be a really easy language to learn. But after some time I realised it was quite hard, especially the grammar. But the good thing in all of this is that it becomes to be easy again after you learn some basic grammatic stuff :) But I'm not sure if everybody has the same opinion, it's just mine! :D

July 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/esteliflores

Well, they confirm you that at the Idioms section: "Deutsche Sprache, schwere Sprache" (German language, difficult language) :P. However, I found out that the vocabulary is really similar to English, and German is really practical: you can "break down" the complex words, and you'll find out that they're just compound words :).

July 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SharyOrta-

You'll get it. It's not as difficult for me as french is, at least listening to the recorded voice. French gets confusing. What about German makes it difficult, for you?

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheGandalf

I think each language on Duolingo has its difficult point for English speakers. For French that would be understanding the words audibly, with German it's pretty easy to understand the words, but not so easy to remember all the bits of grammar.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikaBaby

yess. it's way easier for me to remember french as soon as I hear or see it. But duo sometimes im like "wtf did that say" even when it's slow. With german the only thing that confuses me after sound is "am i going to spell this right?"

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tkaschel

I agree. Listening and speaking French due to the pronunciation and speed required is tough for me. I have gotten discouraged with French because of it. I am only starting my German tree and find it pretty easy so far but this discussion thread is scaring me for later!

January 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizu1527

I didn't listen to my cousin when she said German is difficult

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vatsanshuman

After completing the Spanish tree I have started learning German. But the problem for me is not grammar or vocabulary, it's pronunciation. I have been really finding it difficult to pronounce these words. Can you please help me to get it right ? I am really squeezing out my tongue. :-P

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dallontrash

Really, it's all a matter of listening and practicing the sounds until you can say it. I still struggle with pronunciation, too sometimes, but I'm also learning it in school and my teacher usually has us say the words after her. I remember at the beginning of my first year, she'd have us each individually say the phrases word after word until we got the pronunciation right, so you could try listening to phrases slowly and repeating it out loud word after word. It really helps, I think. Also, when you learn the alphabet, say it out loud, too. When you learn the alphabet and you know what sounds each letter makes, it can make pronunciation easier, too :)

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vatsanshuman

Thanks. I will try.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dallontrash

No problem, I hope it helps!

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vivvvh

I agree!

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kayleeqaz

It's kind of hard.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FKrasniqi

Just started learning German and it is definitely difficult! I thought French grammar was horrible!

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IAmJon

I found German hard to learn. So much so that I stopped in the end. People go on and on about English being a Germanic language but it really means nothing. In my opinion English is much closer to French than any other language. Even now two thirds through my French tree, I'm still amazed at how similar new words I am learning are to English ones. English is hard to classify because of how many other languages influenced it.

German felt more foreign when learning. I became really confused around the accusative and the dative case, so gave up. There are also three genders which are confusing. Even though I had studied it at school it felt like starting over. I think German is a cool language and would like to resume learning it, it isn't as close to English as people say and is especially hard if you go in with that mindset.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Comradesev

Actually, Frisian is the closest modern living language to English. It's Germanic: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Frisian_language http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Frisian_language

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stormfell

That's actually really interesting about frisian. One of my really good friends speaks dutch and frisian so I might give it a try just to see what it's like. But after german, polish is definitely going to be a priority, only because I love the way it sounds _

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stormfell

Yea I totally agree with you. People like to go on saying english and german are in the same family, yet then why is is so much easier for english speakers to learn latin languages like french than german. I guess that both english and german might have at some point in history been closely related, but the languages have both changed so much that you can't really say that german is similar to english anymore.

This isn't necessarily a bad thing, I like languages that are different from my own native one because of how different they sound, but saying that they are similar just because "oh germanic i got one of those down, it must be easy" isn't really all that true.

By the way, yea, french is really quite easy in my opinion too. Such a shame I never bothered with it, I don't like the french language as much as german, so that's why.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Comradesev

Also, have you ever tried Dutch, it's like German and Old English had a baby.

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ACatterpillar

Actually, I found Latin harder to learn than German. As a native English speaker, German has more similarities than Latin. And same, German is the only current English->__ DuoLingo course which interests me. : /

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stormfell

I guess language difficult is pretty subjective for the most part, huh? I've never tried to learn latin so I wouldn't know whether it's hard or easy. I am actually very interested in the polish course, though I know it looks like it will be a loooong long time before it's released [: I've also heard of how difficult learning polish is, but I think it's a beautiful language, and as long as you're determined, I don't think difficulty is enough to stop a person from learning something they want to learn.

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seolferwulf

Probably because of the Norman (French) invasion of 1066 which "Frenchified"?! (changed) our language considerably.

July 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZainabSajid

No, German is the most easiest language, but french, spanish and russian are also typically tough.

July 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philop

German is compared to other languages pretty easy.

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lyssas274potatoe

i understand your point. its just hard for me

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anglea

I find German really hard too.

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nemesis_NaR

I've once read on the internet, that gramaticcaly the moct difficult languague is Polish. I'm Czech and that's almost the same. So how can a languague be more difficult than German:

3 genders and together something like 20 ways how noun endings behave in 7 cases (however 6 are really used). So in German you have to learn der, die das for four cases, in Czech you have 20 different endings for 6 cases.

Verbs are also in cca 20 categories, each with different conjugation and for most of the activities there are two verbs that have slightly different meaning concerning the future.

Word order is absolutely idiomatic, no easy rules as in German.

Yeah and so on... So be glad for der, des, dem, den :-)

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ACatterpillar

Wow. Czech sounds a lot like Latin, but worse...

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SethFriday

Like any new language, learning German definitely has its challenges. What are you having trouble with?

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lyssas274potatoe

well like i said i'm just beginning. So the basics like he likes she likes we like you know lesson one!

July 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tgb746

Es ist Spiel und Spaß bis jemand zu des Konigs Hof geht.

Here's some other pitfalls that I fall for at least once a day especially the capitalization.

Sie essen das Brot. They eat the bread. sie isst das Brot. She eats the bread. Ihre Hut ist Toll. Your hat is great. ihre hut ist Toll. Her hat is great!

These are the parts of German that make things difficult. That and sentences like: Er lag auf seinem panzerartig harten Rücken und sah, wenn er den Kopf ein wenig hob, seinen gewölbten, braunen, von bogenförmigen Versteifungen geteilten Bauch, auf dessen Höhe sich die Bettdecke, zum gänzlichen Niedergleiten bereit, kaum noch erhalten konnte.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kunstkritik

These are the parts of German that make things difficult. That and sentences like: Er lag auf seinem panzerartig harten Rücken und sah, wenn er den Kopf ein wenig hob, seinen gewölbten, braunen, von bogenförmigen Versteifungen geteilten Bauch, auf dessen Höhe sich die Bettdecke, zum gänzlichen Niedergleiten bereit, kaum noch erhalten konnte.

yes sure. That is a sentence that has no end and therefore would be difficult in many languages. Fun fact: Nobody speaks like that. No news paper article has sentences like that. Most books don't have sentences like that.

Ihre Hut ist Toll. Your hat is great. ihre hut ist Toll. Her hat is great!

Ihr Hut ist toll. Your (formal) hat is great. Ihr Hut ist toll: Her hat is great! (just small corrections) But that just brings me to the next point. Why are all people emphasizing on the formal you >.> In an everyday conversation you most likely will talk with friends and people who are familiar to you. Therefore you will most likely need the informal you more often. Also as a novice of a language ... nobody would mind you if you say "du" to them

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tgb746

I meant my post as light light-hearted jabs at some interesting bits of German. The first sentence is a joke about Genitive case. The Kafka sentence is also a joke.

Thanks for the corrections. I still have a hard time with the Grammar. I was just relating an experience two days ago where I had lost a heart due to the difference between Ihre and ihre; which was the first time I had experienced it. Nothing to do there except practice the rules more.

As for siezen and duzen yea, I know most people won't be upset about it. Most of the time I think people understand what speaking a second language means, and just how difficult it is.

But in my experience in the US some people dislike people who can't or don't speak English properly. In my experience many people don't understand just how fluid language is, and they may not even know that they are speaking a dialect different than another person.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kunstkritik

I meant my post as light light-hearted jabs at some interesting bits of German. The first sentence is a joke about Genitive case. The Kafka sentence is also a joke.

I know. I tried to not sound rude or so ... but I know that many people just believe everything . side note: I think as a native speaker it is always really really weird seing other people complaining how difficult your language is.

Thanks for the corrections. I still have a hard time with the Grammar. I was just relating an experience two days ago where I had lost a heart due to the difference between Ihre and ihre; which was the first time I had experienced it. Nothing to do there except practice the rules more.

One of my friends speaks german as a third language for a long time now and still does mistakes with genders or so. I don't mind it at all, it makes me thinking more of my native language. (But I should not count since I am a really weird language obsessed person anyway ;) ) The more you talk, the better you become. I managed to (kind of) stop him doing the annoying "wie und als" mistake in german. So everything is possible.

As for siezen and duzen yea, I know most people won't be upset about it. Most of the time I think people understand what speaking a second language means, and just how difficult it is.

So far as I can tell from my experience, people only mind those who pronounce the ch as sch (not talking about dialects but straight Hochdeutsch) when it becomes clear that you can actually speak german on a good level.

But in my experience in the US some people dislike people who can't or don't speak English properly. In my experience many people don't understand just how fluid language is, and they may not even know that they are speaking a dialect different than another person.

Well you probably meet those kind of (stupid) people here. However I have to say that a lot of germans love talking/ practising their english with others, which would mean that if "we" see you are stuggeling in german, we want to help you by communicating with you in english, because it is easier for most people or you are a native speaker of english anyway. The thing about the dialects happens in german either. People like to make fun of other peoples dialects (especially sächsisch) ... you can say what you want to it about that.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PriceLB

I'm trying to learn Japanese (with different resources, obviously). So German is a nice break during the day. It is 1 million times easier for me to learn German than Japanese. So it feels like a breeze. lol

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikaBaby

tried learning jap back in middle school. realized rosetta stone is the worst thing ever from an early age and still havent gone back to it although i count everything in japanese still haha. it seems like it's learning two languages at once since you need to know the letters and symbols but id like to eventually get back into it.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PriceLB

I'm using Japanesepod101, multiple apps, classes, flash cards, books, etc. haha Learning to read and write the Kana and Kanji is a big hurdle for sure.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arisdon

Argghhhh! It's do frustrating getting one tiny word wrong!

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stormfell

It is slightly hard, but that shouldn't discourage you. For me, the hardest thing about german is the grammar so far, but if you put things into perspective it's not so bad. If you think german is hard, think about how impossible slavic languages must be, or even worse, languages like japanese.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lyssas274potatoe

i agree

July 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

German gets a lot easier when you learn Portuguese, for example.

The roots of the words are similar between English and German, but German sentences resemble a lot more the Portuguese sentences, because of a great Latin influence.

....but I wouldn't say Portuguese is easy either. It also has genders (not three, just two) and declensions.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krizia.roh

I believe it is easier if your first language is english. but if your first language is spanish... you are basically screwed.

July 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lyssas274potatoe

when i read what you posted, i died laughing! :)

July 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krizia.roh

why? are you identified?

I mean, german sort of starts to make sense to me from english... not from spanish. It takes a while for me to switch my brain I dont know if that happens to everyone.

Si te sientes identificada, Hola!

July 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lyssas274potatoe

my first language is French, but i'm laughing because i'm almost fluent in Spanish even if i'm only on lesson 3, my friends taught me allot of Spanish so i think i can relate to your statement.

July 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krizia.roh

Yes, French sort of resembles Spanish but is much harder in writing because of the accentuation. German decided to add umlauts and "beta" symbols... like, what is that? French is definitely easier for me than German.

July 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lyssas274potatoe

coolio

July 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gc49k

I concur...at first, learning German language is a bit difficult until a learning a few rules. The explanations provided by duolingo are concise - not a lot of fat added. From what I recall, some of the irregular verbs seem to be exceptions to rules of the game and may be frustrating. I do like duolingo very much; however, I realize it won't be enough for me to become fluent in the language, yet I'll be a little closer to the goal.

July 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcy001

ja, ich machen

July 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crue1990

hey guys sorry for disturbing and asking something what is not in relation with this theme, but am i the only one which has problems with android duolingo application, it cant connect to my account and i cant continue with my progres it stopped yesterday 03.07, and it is still not working, but when i log on web page everything is ok, i tryed to delete the application and istall it again, it is the same problem :(

July 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlmogL

German is hard, but well worth it!

July 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thewiseman

I just found out Radio Lingua Coffee Break German to be good

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leverkusenmitte

Agree. Maybe German is close to English. But it's far more difficult than English.

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krizia.roh

Who said it was easier than English? This post is to adress how difficult German is. :P

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crazy-amour

AGREED!!!

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IchbinAmerikaner

Okay, apparently people on here have mixed ideas of how hard German is. For me, it is difficult, though not as difficult as it is for some, and I'm catching on okay (except for with some adjectives etc, and with the grammar in a lot of cases). It would be easier if they'd explain why with some things, and how the sentence would be put together in German, and things like that.

As far as most difficult languages on here, out of the ones I've tried I'd have to say Italian, but that's just me. And it's getting easier, maybe partly because I'm learning Spanish, too. (Finally finished Level 1 in Italian today.)

July 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kultivert

I really like German, an for me it is a LOT easier than any of the Romatic language. My pronunciation is atrocious in French etc. Gluckliche fur mich, lerne ich nur Deutch in meine Schule!

July 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lyssas274potatoe

hey, even though French is a love language, its still awesome to know.

July 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tchapman89

The thing I have found to be most helpful is to create a cheat sheet as you go along. It's there if you're at zero hearts and want to not fail, hoping you already have the answer. But more importantly, I have found just making the cheat sheet helps me remember more.

July 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EnisBarbullushi

I really think you people shouldn't complain about German. In a distant future, when Polish, Albanian, Russian, Bulgarian, Hungarian, Estonian or Swahili language courses will be available, you will dream of a language as easy. The first three are terrifyingly difficult, especially Albanian, pretty much a language shrouded in total mystery, extremely old and with sounds that simply cannot be pronounced, which is one of the reasons Albanians can learn every language twice as fast as other learners. Bis dann, viel Erfolg

July 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lyssas274potatoe

ok sorry about complaining, i didnt mean any disrespect.

July 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jlitzenb

I find myself being so focused on what I just learned that I make stupid mistakes with basic words.

July 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/s.cat.farrell

There is a idiom for that, ha ha. "Deutsche sprache, schwere Sprache". Essentially meaning "German is hard".

But then again there is also: "Es ist noch kein Meister vom Himmel gefallen." Which is the German idiom for "practice makes perfect." So even if it is hard at first, just keep trying. You will get there eventually.

If you can't tell, I just managed to get through the idiom lesson, :P

July 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kunstkritik

Actually the better equivalent of "practice makes perfect" is: Übung macht den Meister.

July 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/s.cat.farrell

Thanks for the tip! Ironically, I just finished going over that idiom when you replied.

July 13, 2014
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