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  5. "Thig a-steach an-dràsta."

"Thig a-steach an-dràsta."

Translation:Come in just now.

December 20, 2019

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ollie-Benson

Does "just now" mean the same as "right now"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KrisHughes8

In English, "right now" can sound a bit imperative. (Hurry up!) An drasda doesn't really have that feel. "Just now" is a common Scottish idiom, as is "the now/the noo" It's more conversational filler, than anything, or merely means "now".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatMcCat

When we say "just now" (Canadian English), it means more that something has just happened. For example, "Just now, I saw a man run past the window."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spigette

I was going to say the same thing. If something happened "just now" that implies it has already happened in the very recent past, it doesn't mean it is still in tbe process of happening, which would be "right now".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katyalexlove

Almost. Trying to put this sentence in context, in Scotland, if you'd arrived somewhere and the person you were coming to see wasn't there, I might ask "Do you want to come in just now and wait for them?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SandraSmit509106

a-steach vs. a-staigh

These two words could both be translated as "in". They follow a similar pattern to the one above.

a-steach - implies movement

Ist, tha Iain a' tighinn a-steach!

Be quiet, Iain is coming in!

a-staigh - no movement

Tha Iain a-staigh. Tha mise a' falbh.

Iain is in. I am leaving.

N.B. In Uist, Barra, and Eriskay, a-staigh is often used even when there is movement involved:

Òbh òbh, tha Iain a' dol a-staigh. - Oh dear, Iain is going in.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christie686527

When I lived on Skye people would say thig a-staigh rather than thig a-steach. Is this a regional variation or is there a subtle difference between the two?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneMacken3

That's what I've heard in W Ross too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

I came here to say that 'a-staigh' is what I know, too. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivitcyex

A-steach implies movement, whereas a-staigh does not. There is dialectical variation in usage, as you point out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Francesconian

That's my question too. Is there any difference between "a-staigh" and "a-steach"? Because the one I learnt first was "a-staigh", then, as I watched more and more videos, I noticed people saying "a-steach".

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