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https://www.duolingo.com/finn.fr

Quebec or France?

finn.fr
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Hey everybody...so I'm sure this has been asked before, but does Duolingo French teach French more commonly used in Quebec or France? I don't care either way, but was just curious...

Merci!

4 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/finn.fr
finn.fr
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Merci beaucoup!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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De rien. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/prky
prky
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My favorite site for learning about Quebec French (?) is OffQc I Quebec French Guide. C'est formidable !

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BastouXII
BastouXII
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Here's a link to it : OffQc.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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This has me wondering.... are these dialects as similar as Spanish or English dialects? In other words, after I finish my French tree on Duolingo, can I reasonably expect to go to Canada and struggle through some basic conversations, and understand what's going on, and make myself understood? That's my goal!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MotoAdrenaline

Yes, I live in Montreal and here people will generally understand you if you speak pure France French. Montreal is probably more understanding than elsewhere in Quebec, but I don't think you would have much problem, the differences in dialect are minimal.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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Thanks for the info! I'm putting Montreal on my list of "most preferred places to visit" :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulscon

the differences in accent are....

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BastouXII
BastouXII
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I had posted a comment in the discussion about Quebec French resources which should interest you in that matter :

Here is a comparable sketch in European French and Canadian French. They're from famous Canadian French humorist François Pérusse (he's actually from the city where I live). He makes short audio sketches called Les deux minutes du peuple since the early 90's and, in the early 2000's, he started recording sketches for Europe as well, some of which were directly adapted from his previous ones for Quebec. These are caricatured a lot, but it gives a good idea. If you can understand his work and you like it, he made 10 albums in Quebec, 2 in France and a few DVDs from his TV series (he made the voices and a studio created animations to match them).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Percival1485
Percival1485
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Brillant, merci!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BastouXII
BastouXII
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International French (basically Parisian French without argot, which is parisian slang, and the accent toned down a bit) will be understood everywhere. Some people having learnt International or European French sometimes struggle to understand everything Quebeckers say, especially rural and less educated ones. A while back I've created a discussion with resources specifically for Canadian French. You may want to check it out to familiarize your ear to the Quebec accent.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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Thank you! Merci !

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BastouXII
BastouXII
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As mentioned by others, Duo teaches Parisian French (which is different from Belgian, Swiss, Midi, or southern France French, etc.) If you take out every argot (parisian slang), which Duo doesn't really teach anyway, and tone down the accent a bit, you get standard French, which would be understood everywhere in French speaking communities. But, if you master it to a fluent level, people will identify you instantly as either a non-native or a TV / Radio host, because nobody really speaks without a regional accent and expressions.

As a side note, if you are interested in Québec French, I've just updated my discussion about Quebec French with new resources, check it out!

Oh! And do not confuse Quebec French and Canadian or North American French. Although Quebec is the largest community of French speakers in the Americas, there are many different dialects and accents of French spoken outside of Quebec, among which Acadian (mostly in New Brunswick), Cajun (Louisiana state in the US), the Manitoba French community and the Ontario one being the most populous. All speak some variations of French that can differ a lot from Quebec French.

4 years ago