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  5. "She is so grumpy."

"She is so grumpy."

Translation:Tha i cho greannach.

December 22, 2019

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FiferWD

In my dictionary, grumpy is gruamach. Gearanach, not greanach, is grumbling. From "The Pocket Gaelic -English English - Gaelic Dictionary" compiled by Angus Watson. Which is correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

Hmm, depends how you are using 'grumpy' in English.

If you mean that someone is being a bit crabbit or grouchy, then you would use greannach.

To me, gruamach is glum or dismal; someone who is grumpy in a sad way, rather than an angry way, if that makes sense? I'm not sure I would personally use it to translate 'grumpy'.

Gearanach is like grumpy in the whiny or complaining sense; a gearan is a 'complaint'.

Does that clear it up?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FiferWD

Yes, thank you very. My son in law's father is known to our grand daughter as grumps (which is really unfair to Rod). So I will call him Greannach.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Highlander.Flori

What does your MOD mean - moderate / moderator / a "Mod" (like STING in "Quadrophenia") ?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pete670519

The Wiktionary for Scottish Gaelic also does not contain greannach as a word. For gruamach it gives the primary definition of "surly". When looking up the English grumpy it gives only the choice of crosta or gruamach.

I realize Wiktionary, being volunteer maintained, is not complete, but that it corresponds with another dictionary seems like it's more of a source error than an oversight. Is "greannach" a fairly new word in the language? Or a previously unpopular word that has become more common recently?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IainTurpie

It does contain greannach. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/greannach#Scottish_Gaelic

It also contains gearanach and gruamach, but they seem to differ slightly in definition, and I think greannach is probably the best for English "grumpy"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marlies753464

Why is the 'i' there, when it doesn't seem to be needed in other instances?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nate104632

I is to specify that it's female. E is male. Does that answer your question?

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