Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Ellos tienen buenos principios."

Translation:They have good principles.

1
5 years ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/vikukunta
vikukunta
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13

"Beginning" was accepted as a translation for principio in another equally senseless sentence.

21
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sej
sej
  • 25
  • 12
  • 10
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2

I think the point is to teach us that "principios" has two quite distinct meanings, 'principles' AND 'beginnings', and to make us aware of both of them and when to pick which one...

22
Reply15 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kainui

That would be nice, but really there's nothing wrong with saying someone has good beginnings as far as I'm concerned.

12
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

What does that mean "Someone has good beginnings"?

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

That they were off to a good start/started out at in a good place - it's a figurative meaning? I think duolingo puts together weird sentences like this on purpose to test our knowledge of each word, when we can't really rely on context to understand. ??

15
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tessmolloy123

I agree with you. they have good beginnings is often used in English.

9
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ewarebball

i would say their parents are well off and or they were in a good place at a young age. for example good at sports or talented in music. seeing actions from the start

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anomalousjack

A song might have a good beginning... but not such a good middle part or end!

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zelmon
Zelmon
  • 16
  • 14
  • 11
  • 7

Why is the adjective before the noun in this sentence?

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClaireOver

i was wondering that too

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dtpetry

Adjectives such as good/bad tend to come before the noun. Many others like that exist that I haven't even begun to memorize!

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanTully1

strangely DL rejects "They hold good principles" even though it is correct English and a better English usage. Tener can mean both "to have and to hold" in the words of the wedding vow.

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/InternalCorp.

why cant it be ''they have good starts''

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zoya192005

Why can't I put, They have good starts?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SquiggsMitchell

Maybe "foundation" would be a more appropriate meaning to fit both of DLs suggestions of 'principle' and beginning'?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shemp
shemp
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 12

I agree with skrupulus and Kainui, I'm reporting this as a problem, I've had good luck in that dept. lately.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

What did you report?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PDesai9

Is it always okay to put buen/buena/buenos/buenas before the noun? Is it just a matter of emphasis? When is it not okay?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Airman117
Airman117
  • 11
  • 10
  • 5
  • 3

Principio can mean "beginning", like ,"al principio,..."

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Si_Robertson

Can it mean school principles?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AllenRod
AllenRod
  • 25
  • 22
  • 4
  • 1634

You may be referring to principals.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Si_Robertson

Yep.... how do you say that in Spinish?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AllenRod
AllenRod
  • 25
  • 22
  • 4
  • 1634

El director de escuela I think.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Si_Robertson

So like director.... actually I just looked it up and it looks like this could be correct but it also looks like it can be "principal", spelled the same way as the English

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AllenRod
AllenRod
  • 25
  • 22
  • 4
  • 1634

Gracias!

1
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pteston

Should this be "principios buenos?"

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cbingiel

I kind of want them to accept "principals" as a spelling error...this has been a major spelling problem of my life. I remember once a 6th grade teacher saying "remember the person is princi-pal, cause they are your pal!" Maybe that mental trick will help somebody else who keeps missing this one, it certainly hasn't cured me of this spelling mistake >.<

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annemarieh1000

i tried 'values' for principles, and it wasn't accepted.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanTully1

So is this a comment on their morals or does it mean they have a good foundation in something i.e. they have grasped the principles?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamsOfFluency

In English, this could all be correct. I'd like to know if it is the same in the Spanish context.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eugenio-Ruisenor

Why "they hold good principles" is wrong?

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

It seems to me to be common sense, and a good principle, to translate using the translations that make sense.

Me parece que es de sentido común, y un buen principio, traducir usando las traducciones que tengan significado.

0
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WrongCannon

i misspelled principles as principals :(

0
Reply2 months ago