1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Klingon
  4. >
  5. "QI bIng wIchIq."

"QI bIng wIchIq."

Translation:We crossed under the bridge.

December 28, 2019

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phuvtuo

Using chIq doesn't seem right here. If you were crossing over the bridge or on a road, you would use chIq. However, when you cross under a bridge then you are in effect going through an opening similar to a tunnel or a doorway so then shouldn't vegh be used instead?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdmcowan

I could certainly see that being a common way to talk about passing under a bridge. Of course one can also "cross the area under a bridge", so the sentence presented also seems fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phuvtuo

So then you could use chIq with going through a doorway as well but it would then more reference somehow crossing a threshhold such as maybe an alarm sensor installed in the door or a line on the ground rather than the fact that you are going through an opening?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Qov-jIH-je

The verb for passing through an existing opening like a door is vegh but I suppose if you wanted to emphasize that you were crossing the threshold rather than going through the portal, chIq would be appropriate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidTrimb3

The problem here is the English sentence, not the Klingon. One doesn't say cross under a bridge to mean travel along a path that leads under a bridge. One might say go under a bridge or travel under a bridge, but not cross under a bridge. At least, not that I've ever heard.

The Klingon sentence, on the other hand, means exactly what it says: we cross the area that is under the bridge.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Qov-jIH-je

Cross under the bridge is in use in English. One of the examples below is from my own city. It may however be telling that the first definitively American result (the Colorado bridge one could be a foreign tourist) is from 1893. If it's truly not valid in modern American English, you're right: it should probably be changed, given that the Duolingo flag for English is the American one. It's often very surprising to me which words and expressions are not used by our southern neighbours. I got a lot of blank looks trying to find the parkade where we'd left the rental car in San Francisco. I thought it was just that we were asking people who didn't drive, thus didn't pay any attention to the location of multi-storey parking lots.

https://www.tripadvisor.com/LocationPhotoDirectLink-g33450-d1367484-i232906052-Western_Colorado_Botanical_Gardens-Grand_Junction_Colorado.html

https://www.quora.com/Why-dont-people-cross-under-the-bridge-when-a-train-is-moving-over-it

https://globalnews.ca/news/1064757/netting-to-be-installed-under-sections-of-pattullo-bridge-to-catch-debris/

https://books.google.ca/books?id=fzyRebt-ooUC&pg=PA456&lpg=PA456&dq=%22cross+under+the+bridge%22&source=bl&ots=tu2_iy5EKf&sig=ACfU3U15Cps7C5BGdsCScCwWK8blE-A8Kw&hl=tlh&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj_ieehltnmAhWMvp4KHROGDOAQ6AEwCHoECAoQAQ#v=onepage&q=%22cross%20under%20the%20bridge%22&f=false


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidTrimb3

Those definitely sound odd to me, and they are mostly accompanied by other language that sounds odd to me. It's certainly a dialectical difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phuvtuo

Yes, I know it is vegh. That is why I brought up walking through a door. Because it is the same to me as crossing under a bridge. Thank you for explaining about using chIq would mean if going through an opening. I have a better understanding of chIq/vegh now.

Learn Klingon in just 5 minutes a day. For free.