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"Tienes que esperar aquí."

Translation:You have to wait here.

5 years ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AaronTovo

sometimes duolingo accepts 'must' for 'tener que' and sometimes it doesn't. Tenemos que informar los oficiales!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ron.seymour

Ron Seymour. I am sorry but I fail to grasp the point that you are making.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Portach

I believe must and have should both be accepted in this sentence

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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Because you think they mean the same thing? If, as is explained above, there is a difference in degree of urgency between 'tienes que" and "debes" then that difference needs to be learned.

Even in English there is a difference of urgency between "You must stay here" and "You have to stay here", so why is this causing a problem?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
BenYoung84
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No there is not a difference of urgency between You must stay here and You have to stay here in English, and in the past tense 'had to' is used for both.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
BenYoung84
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Thanks for the link, it supports my argument well.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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Yeah some people argue there is a difference but to me if you have to do something then you must and if you must do something then you have to. So they seem equal to me. I say just keep reporting it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

I agree with you totally. I'm more concerned with AaronTovo's question about why Duo sometimes only accepts "must" in place of "tener que" some of the time. It's not really correct, because of what you've said, but sometimes the app insists that we translate it that way, but other times says it's wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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You don't give an example, so I am guessing at why, but I expect that this may be happening on a set phrase that is more commonly "must" in English rather than "have to". In short, this is a concession to reality.

As a matter of learning it serves duo best to hold a strict and consistent line where they can on translations. Problem is, languages are not rules-based in the sense that a tener que in one context will always mean the same level of intensity of obligation in another. Also, usages differ across location and language. An idiomatic combination using deber can carry just as much obligation as a "have to", and vice versa.

To be useful as a learning tool duo has to walk that fine line between giving a definitional sense of a word or phrase, while giving leeway to how the language is actually used. A too strict literalism is where Spanglish comes from.

Still, that is a bit nuanced for a beginner to attempt to negotiate. The upshot remains for anyone who is just learning the meanings of words and general grammar rules through these lessons, it does you no harm to stick with a literal definition where you can until you get a better sense of Spanish and how it is used. At some point all this clicks together and these inconsistencies don't matter anymore.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

jindr, I like what you said and the way you put it a lot.

As an experiment, I tried using, "You need to wait here" as in this case, "have to," and "need to," seemed equivalent to me. And that interpretation was accepted as being valid.

A problem many students have,here, is that they like to think Duolingo is teaching translation, per se, whereas the provided English words, phrases, and sentences only serve to enable us to understand what the Spanish words, phrases, and sentences mean. Thus, the closer our English interpretations are to a literal translation the better.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ericksda

While I am still learning Spanish, I know in French there is an imperative tense for verbs. Perhaps this is the case here as well.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

ericksda- I don't see any imperative here. Imperative would be : espera aquí, in French : attends ici, in English, wait here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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I agree!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/goopl
goopl
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Why is there a need for a "que" in here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

The verb "tener" means "to have" something in the sense of possession. "Tengo un gato" = "I have a cat." When you add the "que" to a "tener" verb, the meaning becomes "to have [to do something]."

"Tengo el libro." = "I have the book."

"Tengo que estudiar todo el libro." = "I have to study the whole book."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SPierce2

Thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1000p

I hear this a lot in Spain.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleFenorme

...said Estragon to Vladimir.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sfjorge
sfjorge
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I can put waiting instead to wait?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carol298405

The word 'here' was not there

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erin895809

You used "hear" instead of "here"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IDTDM

How do you know they mean you have to wait here and not I have to wait here

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

Tienes que = "You have to (do something)"

Tengo que = "I have to (do something)"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/traceymarie1

Thanks everybody

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
BenYoung84
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I assume that in this sentence esperar could easily mean 'wait' or 'hope'?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olivercfc

It's really hard to hear the 'que' on the web version of this (unless you choose the slow version)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pokerguy365

Can this also be "You have to hope here"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Alphonse, I respect your comments and patience, but would like to play "devil's advocate" on this point. I admit I am no linguist, but wonder why "must" would need any further conjugation than 1st person if it is merely an "internalized" directive.

Also, a sample scenario re: consequences: Lifeguard: "The rules say you HAVE TO stay on this side of the safety rope (or I will make you leave the beach)." You, talking to self, from way past the safety rope: "I MUST swim faster than Michael Phelps, or that shark is going to eat me." ;-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/doggiehx

(␇) at

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertKinzie

The 'correct' answer given to me was "You've to wait here." ???

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rubescube

You guys are surely well educated and loooong winded.can we get the shorter version of these debates. Por favor!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rubescube

Wow! I gotta be more careful!

7 months ago