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  5. "His name is Sam."

"His name is Sam."

Translation:اِسْمهُ سام.

December 30, 2019

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nvrslps

Is it ismu or isma?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyyashElmota

Ismuhu, silenced it would be Ismuh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

But it doesn't come at the end of the statement, so why does the voice shorten it? Shouldn't we expect to hear ismuhu?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ibraahiim13

Should the first word have a hamza?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyyashElmota

no, ism has a "connected" hamza if you may, it sounds sharp if it comes at the beginning of the sentence, but if in the middle of it, it disappears: Ma Ismuhu, becomes Masmuhu (What is his name).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

Thanks, AyyashElmot. Could you expand a bit? Does "connected hamza" have a name? Is it ever written? When you say "sounds sharp", is that the same as "has a glottal onset"? And when you say "in the middle of [a sentence] " isn't that only if it comes after a word ending in a vowel, like ما? If the preceding word ended in a consonant, would you then get a glottal onset? Knowing very little Arabic, I can't think of an example. Could you kindly give me an example? Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyyashElmota

Hey look, I found a wikipedia entry for it :) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wasla

Just want to drive your attention to something, when you said "a word ending in a consonant", you know in Arabic all words get their vowel sound, long or short, there is a "silence diacritic" used in command verbs, but even that, if it meats a Hamzat Wasel (considered a silenced sound), we break the silence (literally that's what we call it) of the first word. So Wasel won't ever be preceded by a silent consonant. Hamzat wasel is what the "Al" uses (the). So you can imagine the magnitude of Wasel we use daily. Here is an exampe

Alkateb (the writer). Anta-lkateb (you are the writer). الكاتب. أنتَ الكاتب

Silenced example: Khuth (take). Khuth-i-lkitab (take the book) see the -i- thats breaking the silence.
خُذْ. خُذِ الكتاب.

This is really good: http://allthearabicyouneverlearnedthefirsttimearound.com/p1/p1-ch1/helping-vowels-and-the-elidable-hamza/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

That is VERY helpful, thank you , AyyashElmota. And it makes sense of all the additional vowels I kept hearing in the audio of Duolingo sentences. That's great.

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