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"No se puede tener todo."

Translation:You can't have your cake and eat it too.

4 years ago

107 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JGibbins

... For real? It won't accept "You cannot have everything"?? I don't even like cake.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/matthew.a.

I agree. Who in their right mind would think of "You can't have your cake and eat it too"?!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tomk123

No one.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Taureans

Nadie

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

None whose native tongue is English would think of this Spanish sentence as idiomatic for the adage "You can't have your cake and eat it too."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Inowner

As a Spanish native, I don't even think that 'no se puede tener todo' translates to this English adage. Maybe it does in Latin America?

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redphillips

Es solamente un idioma, pero si.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TonyCap2

¿Cierto?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kayamel
kayamelPlus
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I for one immediately thought of that but then got carried away and wrote "birthday cake" instead, which got me dinged. Bummer! On Dl's defense "birthday" was nowhere is the original sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sk1ph1x
sk1ph1x
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I think think that we all agree that this is a terrible error by Duolingo. Even if Duolingo wanted to encourage an idiomatic translation, the literal translation should also be accepted. In the case of "a watched pot never boils" Duolingo accepts: 1) Quien espera desespera; 2) Una olla vigilada nunca hierve.

Yo creo que todos estamos de acuerdo de que este es un gran error por la parte de Duolingo. Aun si Duolingo quiere alentarles a los estudiantes a usar la traduccion idiomatica debe estar aceptada tambien la traducción literal. Como en el caso de "una olla vigilada nunca hierve" Duolingo acepta las dos traducciónes: 1) A watched pot never boils; 2) Quien espera desepera.

Since I was competing against the clock timer I did not get a chance to report this. Hopefully one of you did!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marianne.w4

Now it does accept. 18-1-2015

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gnimble
Gnimble
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It accepts "You cannot have everything" now, as of 2015-02-02. Nice idiom though.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlaskaPixie
AlaskaPixie
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You cannot have it all is accepted

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JBranch1998

The reason I would attribute as to why it did not accept "You cannot have everything" is because "se puede" means "one cannot have." So "?Se puede decir Poquito a poquito Paquito empaca poquitas copitas en pocos paquetes muchas veces rapidamente sin error?" means "Can one say '...' many times fast without messing up?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/atnewton

This feels like it belongs in the Idioms bonus skill.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tomk123

I don't want to learn any idioms until I have learned thre basics of the ordinary language. When I can read a page of Spanish without trouble or even understand what someone is saying, then I can start on picking up idiomatic expression. I the mean time I have enough trouble.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/manny540266

I agree!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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Except that common idioms are integrated into the basics of ordinary language, so learned the usual idioms is a good idea. You probably could have found a more apropos idiom to express your view on, because this particular "idiom" is so troubling and weird, it's not a good example of a normal idiom.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/j_beard2008

I tutor Spanish and got this wrong. I had a native Spanish speaker try and she got it wrong. This translation should only be in the idioms skill.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisCarolyn

Should be taught in the idioms section.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jagmicker

PURE UNADULTERATED OWLSHIT!! :'(

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Satreyu
Satreyu
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Es una mala traduccion!"you can not have your cake and eat it too" debe estar en la sección de modismos

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yimantuwingyai
yimantuwingyai
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"You can't have all of it" or "You can't have it all" ...would these be acceptable translations?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shirabj

I agree. I wrote "You cannot have it all" and I'm asking the same question.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sinaj1

"You cannot have everything" is more accurate, the cake thing should definitely be in idioms.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PerlaNegra20

This is complety non sense.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scottb73

This one was ridiculous.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arie0506

This is not right. I would have never thought of cake! Fix it!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eringregorydavis

Why can't I say "she" or "he"? They don't specify so I can say he/she/you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DesertTerrapin

This is my question, also

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inckwise

I want to know this too. Isn't "puede" used for he/she???

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kayamel
kayamelPlus
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The "se" means it's a reflexive verb and here it is used in an impersonal mode. Which in english usually translates as "you", "one" (as in "one cannot...eat it too") or sometimes "we".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inckwise

Can you please explain what a reflexive verb is?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RBEssick5
RBEssick5
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A reflexive verb is one where the subject and object of the verb are the same thing/person. For example "Yo lavo el coche" is "I wash the car", but "Yo me lavo" is "I wash myself".

When a reflexive verb is used on an object, it is usually translated as passive voice. E.g., "La puerta se abre" is "The door opened" -- literally, 'the door opens itself'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mariza117439
Mariza117439
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Yes, but "one" in "English" is totally equal to "a person" and "a person" is equal to "he" or "she." Duo should accept answers containing any of these. "A man" and "he" can be used impersonally in English.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mariza117439
Mariza117439
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Those are all correct and reasonable, but Duo is not reasonable, sadly.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BasvanEijk

Cake?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrHowse

This is ridiculous. This is not the translation and should not be in this section.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nikertnemw

I have now done this lesson for the 5th time, and finally was going to make it, had no hearts left, and bam, this.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eastonkugler
eastonkugler
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What the hell?!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveK7

Totally idiotic, pastel is not in their anywhere or tambien. Grrrr

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sharidjazz
sharidjazz
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who would come up with that answer

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bet-BetKol

Where did the cake come from? Like the others, I think this should be in the Idioms section.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mohammed.d

What is this? ?? Is there something wrong here? The translation is completely different from the sentence !!!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JustinTunl
JustinTunl
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Agree with the above- apart from anything else we are trying to learn Spanish rather than English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tgamaran
tgamaran
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Ridiculous, please change

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barry_boettger

Too funny. I'm assuming this was done by someone as part of quitting their job on the duolingo project. Glad I was just practicing my skills rather than trying to get through the lesson.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98
LICA98
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one can't have everything?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98
LICA98
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accepted now

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bdawsn

Lucky for me, this was type what you hear. When I saw the translation, I couldn't believe it!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ah56
ah56
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Ok I will pretend I did not see this one

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/steveansell

I would argue that not only is "you cannot have it all" the correct English idiom for this phrase, but "you can't have your cake and eat it too" is actually wrong. Those two idioms do not mean the same thing. The "cake" idiom is not about wanting to have everything (todo); it is about wanting to have two contradictory things (i.e. your cake after you have already eaten it).

In fact, the wikipedia entry on this idiom actual offers a number of different spanish equivalents such as "Querer estar en Misa y en procesión" (wishing to be both at Mass and in the procession).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/You_can%27t_have_your_cake_and_eat_it

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BiddyT
BiddyT
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So why does it not accept "one cannot have everything". This is an impersonal- in English it equates to 'one' or even 'we' as well as 'you'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sunrises
sunrises
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Duo accepts "You can't have everything." I am curious about the use of "se" here. Can a native speaker give the literal translation of this sentence, please, and why "se"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RBEssick5
RBEssick5
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The reflexive 'se' in sentences like this is one way of forming the passive voice, usually when the actor (i.e., the one who does/has the thing) is unimportant.

A very common usage of this is the phrase "se habla espanol", which translates as "Spanish is spoken here" -- literally something like "Spanish speaks itself" -- as the specific person who speaks Spanish is unimportant.

Another example would be "La puerta se abre", meaning "The door opened" -- literally 'the door opened itself' -- the person/thing that opened the door is unimportant and not mentioned.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/owenms02
owenms02
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I tried "You can't have everything." And it marked me wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vladao
Vladao
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One can not have all. :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dianneja

Puede = HE/SHE/IT. Which was also the "clue". C'mon DL...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reastwoodstone

I think even in idioms. Unless there's mention of cake it still says you can't have everything. It's putting me off. I've been making silly mistakes as I'm progressing n was.feeling I'm not getting anywhere this is putting me off dl

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DutchRafa
DutchRafa
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Pity, wasting time of so many people with this absurd idiom translation...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaDhyan
MaDhyan
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I agree that this was an unexpected curve ball and not welcome. I translated it as 'One cannot have everything', but of course was marked wrong. I'm going to report it. I hope everyone else here does the same. This needs to be changed, at least to accept the literal translation as well as the idiomatic one.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaDhyan
MaDhyan
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I just did this for the second time, using the idiomatic phrase "You can't have your cake and eat it", which is a commonly used expression in the UK - AND WAS MARKED WRONG!!! Because I left out the 'too'. Where in the Spanish version does it indicate 'too'? As you can tell, I am faintly annoyed by this!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eraagars
eraagars
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Doesn't this mean you cannot have everything??

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yimantuwingyai
yimantuwingyai
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"You can not have it all" is not accepted???

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JustinTunl
JustinTunl
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Is it just me, or is the insitance in folksy sayings bloody anoying. (There are stronger folksy ways of saying this)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galletadecolores
galletadecolores
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This is totally off. Who would ever think of putting this translation here???

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanHill0

oh give me a break!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stinagirl14
Stinagirl14
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You can't have everything...where would you put it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ah56
ah56
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You cannot have it all.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBraxton

What is the Spanish word for cake. I don't see any cake in this sentence. Not even a crumb. No cake. Nor a fair sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jerry326506

Where does cake come in?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jerry326506

You can't have it all

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/4Draco4

That's the wrong sentence!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ParkHan

?????

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RagnarokX2

translation is wrong it's supposed to be : you can't have everything.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wilambo
wilambo
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What.. Bug bug bug

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elenita9
Elenita9
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I put "one cannot have everything" and got it correct. Se used like this is impersonal se. Este cuchillo se puede usar, this knife can be used. Se necesita dormir. One needs to sleep or sleep is needed. Not sure why they only used the idiom as the translation. Probably to get a hoot in this comment section

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

The problem is that "You can't have it all" is an English idiom as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanFendel

As of Oct 17, 2016, it is still giving the English idiom as the only translation for the Spanish. (It might accept others -- I can't say -- but it doesn't offer others when doing this as a "write what you hear.")

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nissim94

but ''se'' its ''i know''...

yes?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dkat
dkat
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This is just wrong to suggests this translates to the English idiom. The English idiom may translate to this in Spanish but it is not the same as saying the Spanish translates to the idiom. WRONG

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barrdogg2000
barrdogg2000
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But doesn't No se mean 'I don't know'?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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No sé (with an accent mark) means I don't know.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barrdogg2000
barrdogg2000
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Ah gracias

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dcday7
dcday7
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It seems the direct translation of this phrase would be "you can't have everything." While "you can't have your cake and eat it, too" is a common idiom in spoken English, it means the same thing as the former. Duo should change it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/desrain
desrain
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you can't have everything" not accepted 8/13/17

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kim.macnei

The word cake is not even shown in this sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/regger_
regger_
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It would not accept "He cannot have everything.", so next time around I thought, well, maybe I'm conjugating poder incorrectly, so I entered "I cannot have everything." It said that was wrong also and gave a correct answer as "1 cannot have everything." I said "THAT'S WHAT I TYPED!" and reported a problem before realizing it's a "1" there, not an "I". (If I had anything at stake here I'd argue that I was using Roman numerals.) They really should place "One" there.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zashs
Zashs
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The cake is a lie.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SimonFontana

Cake?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nima.polyglot

So, where is the cake in the sentences?! Maybe, it needs some imagination!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jack346767

The correct saying is "You can't eat your cake and have it too". That is the paradox that makes the point. Obviously one can have some cake that they then can eat. The other way around is not possible. Get it? Also, it was a dumb use of idiom in a strictly vocabulary exercise.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ppicksterplayer1

You cant have everything. Dafuq bout cake and eating lol

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Doug879397

WHAT!!!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RDjMCR
RDjMCR
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I put you cant have it too. I was marked wrong. I also dont understand where cake comes from?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marc_Denis

!error!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yohablaunpoco

You cant have all/everything is the translation it has no mention of cake or eating

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moby246115

Totally ridiculous that the original "You can't have your cake and eat it too" remains in place. It's laughable.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JustinHudg

The male voice actor sounds like his mouth is anesthesized. I'm really tired of being failed for his mumbling.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itsBaldeep

What?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElizavetaC13

You cannot have everything. Where is your cake? Confused.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mbova7
mbova7
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This translation is whack.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joyce436047

Guys it is a Spanish saying like your pulling my leg.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mariza117439
Mariza117439
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Possibilities in English that should be considered correct by Duo:

1) You can't have everything. (Far more common than the more formal #2) 2) One can't have everything. 3) He/She can't have everything. (Possible based on the grammar of the Spanish sentence, and possible in English)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hg3UVt
hg3UVt
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I don't know if you can have everything? Por que no es verdad?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elainerybski

The actual expression is "you can't eat your cake and have it too." It's easy to have the cake and then eat it. It's impossible to eat your cake and then have it. It's been gotten wrong so many times that we accept the wrong expression as the correct one.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jack346767

Just saw this after I posted essentially the same thing. We should be friends lol.

1 year ago