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  5. "That is Effie and big Archie…

"That is Effie and big Archie."

Translation:Sin Oighrig is Eairdsidh mòr.

January 5, 2020

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PamelaKerr4

Why is "Tha sin.." wrong? I think i've missed something! Móran taing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJKay93

My understanding is that if you are describing what "that" is you use "tha sin", but in this case we are introducing "that" as something or someone.

Imagine you are standing in front of a red car and somebody asked you three questions:

  • What is a car?
  • What colour is that car?
  • What is the colour red (or "what does red look like")?

In English you might say:

  • That is a car.
  • That [car] is red.
  • That is red (or "that is what red looks like").

In the first sentence you are introducing the car, in the second sentence your are describing the car, and in the third instance you are introducing the colour. In English we mostly differentiate between the second and third sentences through context or emphasis (that is red vs. that is red), but in Gaelic the sentences are formed differently:

  • Sin càr.
  • Tha sin dearg.
  • Sin dearg.

That is at least my understanding, which could be wrong, but it's got me this far!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SierkeGirl

Shouldn't agus also be accepted in place of is?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TayWhite07

It is accepted. Was there another mistake like maybe writing ''Tha sin'' as opposed to just ''sin''? The reason I ask is that that was my first mistake. I also put ''agus'' instead of ''is'' so I didn't know what part was incorrect. I tried it again only correcting ''Tha sin'' to ''sin'' (while keeping ''agus'') and it was accepted with ''is'' as another correct solution.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sgiandubh

are there guidlines to using tha versus is ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CIMacAonghais

The "is" here is a contraction of "agus" and not a verb.

There are grammar notes for each skill on here or in the web version - https://www.duome.eu/tips/en/gd

They explain it better than I could on here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jacek100686

B I G A R C H I E


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewRoss337855

WHy is it is instead of agus?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

For the same reason people actually say "apples 'n' pears", not "apples and pears".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pamhsiehca

They marked it wrong, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Highlander60

This one seems to have confused everyone. Be nice to have direct links from hard ones with a detailed explanation vs bits n pieces in chat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judica.fortis

There are tips with really good explanations! Sadly Duolingo doesn't make them easily available, although you can find them on desktop.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gizmos69

I don't understand why "Tha sin Oighrig agus Eairdsidh mòr" isn't also acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/3rUc1qLU

why is it not Mor Archie instead of Archie mor


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sgiandubh

becuase adjectives generally follow their noun in gaelic- I m sure this is discussed in the tips section that precedes the lesson


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LyndaParks1

Why not tha sin, as we've previously been taught and how do we know Duo wants us to use "is" instead of "agus"!! Not very clear imho


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tracy961900

I am confused as to when to use "tha sin" or "sin". Any tips??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Atamunu

Why not Sin Oighrig agus Eairdsidh mòr?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmhnall14

Is agus not correct here as well as is?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/manitou1610

I used mhor and was wrong. I thought when talking about two people I should be more formal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FiferWD

Mòr lenites when it describes a feminine noun. In this sentence, it only refers to Archie.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tsuj1g1r1

Is nobody seriously going to talk about "Big Archie"? Why "big"? Do Highlanders tend to give people nicknames that follow this pattern or something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmhnall14

They do, a lot! To take one example out of many, when I lived in Lewis as a child, our next-door neighbour - a tall, elderly man - was known as "Alasdair beag" ("wee Alasdair"); I never knew why. Perhaps his father was also called Alasdair, and the nickname stuck from the son's childhood? In that case, the father would probably have been called "Alasdair mòr" ("big Alasdair") after his son was born and named.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FiferWD

Maybe Big Archie is a highlamd McDonald's.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tsuj1g1r1

But how more Gaelic could a major franchise name get than "McDonald."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/E87wpQTM

What about ‘se sin?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClarNiDhalaigh

Why cant you say 'Is iad'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judica.fortis

"iad" is "they," not "there."

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