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  5. "'S e do bheatha, a charaid."

"'S e do bheatha, a charaid."

Translation:You are welcome, friend.

January 5, 2020

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeffcasavant

Does this translate directly (ignoring the way the phrase works) as "it is your life, friend"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

Aye, literally, it is "It's your life, O friend!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheVeganBaker

Why beatha and bheatha?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nafaei

The word "do" lenites the word that comes after it, so "beatha" becomes "bheatha". It's similar to how feminine words lenite the following adjectives, think "Madainn mhath" and "Oidhche mhath" vs "Feasgar math"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnEdding

Looks like it to me. Well done.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kicki0827

I am confused as to when I use A caraid and when it is vocative, a charaid. Duolingo doesn't seem to correct it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

You'd never use the former, though "a" can be many different grammatical particles, so you could see it before "caraid". The vocative is "a charaid" for the singular, always, and it's used whenever addressing someone as "(O) friend".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/susan961004

Why does my sentance translate to you are welcome friend??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dcrespolara

When we put that A before "charaid" and when we don't? I can't see a rule for that…


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nafaei

The "a" indicates you are addressing them, and causes lenition. So it's something like "caraid" = "a friend" and "a charaid" = "to you, friend"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annalisemquiche

S e ur beatha, rather than s e do bheatha is one a more formal phrasing?

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