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  5. "Tha a' phìob-mhòr cudromach."

"Tha a' phìob-mhòr cudromach."

Translation:The Highland bagpipes are important.

January 7, 2020

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mirokha

I am a little confused. The Gaelic single corresponds to the English plural, right? Or should the translation be 'The Highland bagpipe...'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

You are absolutely correct. I don't know why but that's the way it is. Perhaps it is because the term goes back to before they added the drones, so just refers to the chanter (the pipe you play the tune on). This definitely predates the addition of the drones, as shown by the similar Celtic instrument - the Breton bombard, which is essentially just the chanter. The Bretons also have a one-drone istrument, the binioù kozh. It is singular in French but I cannot find out what it is in Breton. The also have the binioù braz 'pìob mhòr', imported from Scotland. Bombard and binioù kozh Bombard (left) and binioù kozh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mirokha

Oh yes, it's just probably due to the fact that there is more than one pipe in one instrument! ))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Agatha631151

Is "Highland" necessary in the correct responses? I know that there are different varieties of bagpipes, but just "bagpipe" tends to mean one particular instrument.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

I think my answer above answers that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ans176sca

Could Big pipes be added to the right answers as a translation for phiob-mhor please? Because that's what it translates as and that's what most pipers call them in English...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ans176sca

In my experience they do haha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sinelawson

Really, I've never heard them called that? Sorry


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ans176sca

Might be a regional thing then, I've always heard them called that amongst pipers on Skye and in Glasgow.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TayWhite07

Ceòl nan Gàidheal


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BillCassid2

"Tha a' phìob-mhòr cudthromach" is not accepted. Both of my dictionaries (Watson 2012 and Maclennan 1925) give the "cudthromach" spelling. Is this now obsolete? It is interesting to note the derivation from "trom" made obvious by the longer spelling.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

I am afraid I don't know anyone who is in a position to judge a dictionary's accuracy who actually uses either of these dictionaries. I would stick to the two free dictionaries online at https://www.faclair.com/ Am Faclair Beag has some oddities, including a refusal to follow GOC in certain cases, but is generally quite good. Dwelly is generally regarded as the gold standard for 1911 Gaelic. They both tend to list alternatives when they exist, unlike Watson. Dwelly gives only cudthromach, so it was correct. AFB does not even mention cudthromach but has the rather weird habit of redirecting you from spellings it does not accept to ones it does. So in this case, if you search for cudthromach, even when set to 'exact spelling only', it redirects you to cudromach without explaining why.

I mentioned GOC - the Gaelic Orthographic Conventions. This is the accepted definitive list of spellings and it gives only cudromach (in two places). I have never seen cudthromach in any modern document.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BillCassid2

Many thanks for this and for the link to GOC. This has also helped me out with another query I had as it confirms two acceptable spellings of "partaidh/pàrtaidh".

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