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"I have light blue trousers on."

Translation:Tha briogais liath orm.

January 7, 2020

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RussellDornan

Why, when I hovered over the phrase to see the translation to check it before submitting, was the main given phrase "...orn"? I stuck with "orm" because that made sense to me and it was accepted (phew), but wondered why it suggested orn?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

It's a typo, I've fixed it now :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rebekah417138

I have reported it as a mistake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teresa624701

Can both liath and glas be used for light blue and grey?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

liath > light blue; grey (when talking about hair colour)

glas > grey

Colours in Gaelic are a bit tough to define at times, and the definitions do vary a bit from place to place. This is the general rule though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredRiley

As a hillwalker, I normally think of 'glas' as 'grey-green', eg Coire Glas, although as Joanne says colours in Gaelic aren't easily definable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

Colours simply don't match up between languages. Liath is 'lightish-greyish-bluish' and is used for grey hair. Glas is 'greyish-bluish-greenish'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredRiley

This is clear to hillwalkers, that many colours come from the physical environment in the Highlands. Liath, glas, ruadh, odhar come immediately to mind. The translations into English are clumsy and I try to avoid them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

I support that attitude.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rebekah417138

The hover words say this "tha briogais liath orn" - "orn" is not correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joannejoanne12

Fixed it now, thanks :)

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