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  5. "Er folgt dir bis zur Treppe."

"Er folgt dir bis zur Treppe."

Translation:He follows you to the stairs.

July 6, 2014

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krd0019

Steps=Stairs!! Come on


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adishaines

Does anybody know why we need bis and zur? According to the clues they don't really differ in meaning, why not just use one of them? Thank you..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakasiru

You can say "er folgt dir zur Treppe". bis just reinforces that he follows you right until you reach it, and then stops following you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/irlfireprincess

So it sort of means "He follows you up to the stairs"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beneficium

I would also think it has some parallel with the very subtle difference between 'follow to' and 'follow up to'. :) But I'm no native.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuisCasseres96

Vielen Dank. I had just this doubt also


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leforys

Why is "dir" in the dative case if it's the direct object of "folgt"? Shouldn't it be "dich" in the accusative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SmithShi

same question, could any one explain?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakasiru

folgen just needs a dative object. Not every direct object is in accussative, there are verbs that need a dative object, verbs that need a genitive object, verbs that need two objects, verbs that are followed by a second nominative...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SmithShi

thanks a lot! german had driven me nuts crazy!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MyrtleP

But i have it so ingrained in me, that dative implies no movement. So of all the verbs to require a dative object, why a movement verb? Harumph.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakasiru

Because you don't have a preposition here.

"folgen auf" would indeed need accussative, since it's a direction and not a location. But without a two-way preposition, the object you follow is in dative.

Also, "no movement" is a strange way to interpret movemen verbs. I always recommend the distinction:

direction = accussative
location = dative

You can move but stay at the same (described) location, that's what dative is for.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stvwllms

I think "up to the steps" should have been accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chr.lt

Should "He follows you up the stairs" be accepted or not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

No, definitely not. This means he stops following you at the stairs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chen247935

How do I say "he follows you up the stairs"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

Er folgt dir die Treppe hinauf.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheQuazar

Why is this sentence included in 'Dates' section? It has nothing to do with any days or something


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dbayoxy

"He follows you to the stairs" - this statement is correct without "bis". This is a confusing example of how to use "bis"

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